Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

On-Site Occupational Health Nursing Services

On-Site Occupational Health Nursing Services This article has described a quantitative assessment model that was developed to provide useful information to a large corporation about the benefits and costs of an on-site occupational health nursing program. The number and complex nature of the effects of such programs both complicate this task and necessarily restrict the comprehensiveness of its assessment. The model focuses on estimating the net cost savings arising from the direct substitution of on-site for off-site occupational health nursing services.Part II of this article discussed applications of this quantitative assessment model that could be useful to management decision making; identifying assumptions, interpretations, and limitations of the model and illustrating approaches for reducing these limitations.The on-site provision of occupational health nursing services clearly continues to be an issue of interest to large corporations concerned with cost-containment, productivity, and employee relations. While the model and approaches described here are restricted to measurable, short term benefits, the careful measurement of these benefits and costs can usefully inform management decision making until more comprehensive, longer term assessment models can be empirically implemented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

On-Site Occupational Health Nursing Services

AAOHN Journal , Volume 40 (5): 8 – May 1, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/on-site-occupational-health-nursing-services-oG2e0zuMS8
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1992 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999204000506
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article has described a quantitative assessment model that was developed to provide useful information to a large corporation about the benefits and costs of an on-site occupational health nursing program. The number and complex nature of the effects of such programs both complicate this task and necessarily restrict the comprehensiveness of its assessment. The model focuses on estimating the net cost savings arising from the direct substitution of on-site for off-site occupational health nursing services.Part II of this article discussed applications of this quantitative assessment model that could be useful to management decision making; identifying assumptions, interpretations, and limitations of the model and illustrating approaches for reducing these limitations.The on-site provision of occupational health nursing services clearly continues to be an issue of interest to large corporations concerned with cost-containment, productivity, and employee relations. While the model and approaches described here are restricted to measurable, short term benefits, the careful measurement of these benefits and costs can usefully inform management decision making until more comprehensive, longer term assessment models can be empirically implemented.

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: May 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.