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Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Diseases and Universal Precautions

Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Diseases and Universal Precautions Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Diseases and Universal Precautions MEASUREMENT OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS' SELF REPORTED ATTITUDES by Marianne McFarren Grady, MSN, RN, COHN, Linda A. Shortridge, PhD, MN, RN, Linda Sue Davis, PhD, RN, and Carolyn Sue Klinger, MSN, RN, COHN it h in the past decade acquired immune tive agent of AIDS, is transmitted primarily deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has de­ through sexual contact or intravenous drug use, it W veloped into an epidemic of worldwide poses a threat to anyone with unprotected expo­ proportions (Quinn, 1991; Shaw, 1988). While sure to blood or other body fluids. human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causa- HIV infection is the most significant public health crisis of this century (Nelson, 1989). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (1991) estimated that HIV has infected 8 to 10 million adults and one million children world­ ABOUT THE AUTHORS: wide. Projections for the year 2000 predict 14 Ms. Grady is occupational health nurse, Andrew million persons will be infected with HIV (Chin, 1990). Jergens Company, Cincinnati, OH. Dr. Shortridge While AIDS and HIV are relatively recent is Associate Professor and Director, Occupational events in the health care worker (HCW) environ­ ment, bloodborne diseases of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Diseases and Universal Precautions

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1993 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999304101104
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Diseases and Universal Precautions MEASUREMENT OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS' SELF REPORTED ATTITUDES by Marianne McFarren Grady, MSN, RN, COHN, Linda A. Shortridge, PhD, MN, RN, Linda Sue Davis, PhD, RN, and Carolyn Sue Klinger, MSN, RN, COHN it h in the past decade acquired immune tive agent of AIDS, is transmitted primarily deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has de­ through sexual contact or intravenous drug use, it W veloped into an epidemic of worldwide poses a threat to anyone with unprotected expo­ proportions (Quinn, 1991; Shaw, 1988). While sure to blood or other body fluids. human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causa- HIV infection is the most significant public health crisis of this century (Nelson, 1989). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (1991) estimated that HIV has infected 8 to 10 million adults and one million children world­ ABOUT THE AUTHORS: wide. Projections for the year 2000 predict 14 Ms. Grady is occupational health nurse, Andrew million persons will be infected with HIV (Chin, 1990). Jergens Company, Cincinnati, OH. Dr. Shortridge While AIDS and HIV are relatively recent is Associate Professor and Director, Occupational events in the health care worker (HCW) environ­ ment, bloodborne diseases of

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1993

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