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Neurocognitive Performance in Alcoholics: Is Polysubstance Abuse Important?

Neurocognitive Performance in Alcoholics: Is Polysubstance Abuse Important? The neurocognitive effects of alcohol have been frequently examined. Studies reveal a wide array of cognitive deficits. Attempts to develop a parsimonious model for these effects have been difficult because of the intra- and intersubject variability. Complicating the development of a model of cognitive deficits in substance abusers is the common practice of polysubstance abuse. The use of theoretical models that focus on the underlying cognitive processes offers flexibility while maintaining sufficient theoretical precision. This article briefly reviews the literature on neurocognitive changes associated with substance abuse as well as the various theoretical models that have been studied. It also provides an overview of recovery of function. Its primary objective is to evaluate cognitive function among alcoholic subtypes, defined by patterns of other drug use. This analysis suggests there are significant differences in neurocognitive function among these subtypes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Science SAGE

Neurocognitive Performance in Alcoholics: Is Polysubstance Abuse Important?

Psychological Science , Volume 10 (3): 5 – May 1, 1999

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References (43)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1999 Association for Psychological Science
ISSN
0956-7976
eISSN
1467-9280
DOI
10.1111/1467-9280.00130
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The neurocognitive effects of alcohol have been frequently examined. Studies reveal a wide array of cognitive deficits. Attempts to develop a parsimonious model for these effects have been difficult because of the intra- and intersubject variability. Complicating the development of a model of cognitive deficits in substance abusers is the common practice of polysubstance abuse. The use of theoretical models that focus on the underlying cognitive processes offers flexibility while maintaining sufficient theoretical precision. This article briefly reviews the literature on neurocognitive changes associated with substance abuse as well as the various theoretical models that have been studied. It also provides an overview of recovery of function. Its primary objective is to evaluate cognitive function among alcoholic subtypes, defined by patterns of other drug use. This analysis suggests there are significant differences in neurocognitive function among these subtypes.

Journal

Psychological ScienceSAGE

Published: May 1, 1999

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