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Methodological Problems in Determining the Effects of Severe Penalties on Road Safety

Methodological Problems in Determining the Effects of Severe Penalties on Road Safety AUST. & N.Z. JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (December; 1973): 6~ 4 MethodoLogical ProbLems in Determining the Efleets of Severe PenaLties on Road Safety P. G. WARD and R. L. MISNER* IN AUSTRALIA from 1936 to 1968 the annual homicide rate has remained steady (except in war years) at approximately 2 unlawful deaths for 100,000 of population for men and 1 for women. During the same period, the death rate from motor vehicle accidents has risen from 32 to 43 for men and from 8 to 14 for women. Thus, in fact, violence in Australian society is far more a problem of violence on the roads than it is of personal physical violence. The issue becomes: What can society do to reduce this annual slaughter? Can the criminal justice system be expected to limit the yearly carnagev! The following paper describes an ongoing research project of the authors in which they are attempting to assess the effects produced by a magistrate who, within the district under his jurisdiction, habitually gives higher sentences for the same type of offence. The dimculties are many, for as Zlmring and Hawkins point out: "It is far from an easy task to outline the methods by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Methodological Problems in Determining the Effects of Severe Penalties on Road Safety

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/000486587300600405
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AUST. & N.Z. JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (December; 1973): 6~ 4 MethodoLogical ProbLems in Determining the Efleets of Severe PenaLties on Road Safety P. G. WARD and R. L. MISNER* IN AUSTRALIA from 1936 to 1968 the annual homicide rate has remained steady (except in war years) at approximately 2 unlawful deaths for 100,000 of population for men and 1 for women. During the same period, the death rate from motor vehicle accidents has risen from 32 to 43 for men and from 8 to 14 for women. Thus, in fact, violence in Australian society is far more a problem of violence on the roads than it is of personal physical violence. The issue becomes: What can society do to reduce this annual slaughter? Can the criminal justice system be expected to limit the yearly carnagev! The following paper describes an ongoing research project of the authors in which they are attempting to assess the effects produced by a magistrate who, within the district under his jurisdiction, habitually gives higher sentences for the same type of offence. The dimculties are many, for as Zlmring and Hawkins point out: "It is far from an easy task to outline the methods by

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1973

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