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Made in L.A.: Sweated Labor in the U.S. Garment Industry

Made in L.A.: Sweated Labor in the U.S. Garment Industry 837933 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796019837933New Labor ForumDewi and Pottenger research-article2019 Working-Class Voices New Labor Forum 2019, Vol. 28(2) 70 –73 Made in L.A.: Sweated Copyright © 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies Article reuse guidelines: Labor in the U.S. sagepub.com/journals-permissions https://doi.org/10.1177/1095796019837933 DOI: 10.1177/1095796019837933 Garment Industry journals.sagepub.com/home/nlf 1 2 Yeni Dewi with Kressent Pottenger Keywords immigrant workers, sweatshops, women workers, worker centers, capitalism, garment industry Editor’s Note: The more things change, the more they stay the same. To a surprising extent, the super exploitation of early twentieth-century garment workers lives on, not just in Dhaka and Guangzhou, but also in the U.S. Garment sweatshops continue to spring up in immigrant-dense, urban peripheries, perhaps nowhere as much as in L.A. County, the setting of this “Working-Class Voices” essay. Just as in the past, these mostly immigrant female workers labor under the grind of the “piece rate” system, rather than receiving hourly wages; they make clothes for big name brands, but work for largely unregulated subcontractors; and often toil behind locked exits, under dire conditions. The decline in private-sector union density, entrenched obstacles to new organizing, and the underfunding of agencies charged with monitoring labor law compliance go a long http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Labor Forum SAGE

Made in L.A.: Sweated Labor in the U.S. Garment Industry

New Labor Forum , Volume 28 (2): 4 – May 1, 2019

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
ISSN
1095-7960
eISSN
1557-2978
DOI
10.1177/1095796019837933
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

837933 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796019837933New Labor ForumDewi and Pottenger research-article2019 Working-Class Voices New Labor Forum 2019, Vol. 28(2) 70 –73 Made in L.A.: Sweated Copyright © 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies Article reuse guidelines: Labor in the U.S. sagepub.com/journals-permissions https://doi.org/10.1177/1095796019837933 DOI: 10.1177/1095796019837933 Garment Industry journals.sagepub.com/home/nlf 1 2 Yeni Dewi with Kressent Pottenger Keywords immigrant workers, sweatshops, women workers, worker centers, capitalism, garment industry Editor’s Note: The more things change, the more they stay the same. To a surprising extent, the super exploitation of early twentieth-century garment workers lives on, not just in Dhaka and Guangzhou, but also in the U.S. Garment sweatshops continue to spring up in immigrant-dense, urban peripheries, perhaps nowhere as much as in L.A. County, the setting of this “Working-Class Voices” essay. Just as in the past, these mostly immigrant female workers labor under the grind of the “piece rate” system, rather than receiving hourly wages; they make clothes for big name brands, but work for largely unregulated subcontractors; and often toil behind locked exits, under dire conditions. The decline in private-sector union density, entrenched obstacles to new organizing, and the underfunding of agencies charged with monitoring labor law compliance go a long

Journal

New Labor ForumSAGE

Published: May 1, 2019

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