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Indian cities, sanitation and the state: the politics of the failure to provide

Indian cities, sanitation and the state: the politics of the failure to provide The environmental problems confronting Indian cities today have arisen because millions of people have been forced to live in illegal settlements that lack adequate sanitation and other basic urban services. This is the result of two factors. The first is the legacy of the colonial city characterized by inequitable access to sanitation services, a failure to manage urban growth and the proliferation of slums, and the inadequate funding of urban governments. The second is the nature of the post-colonial state, which, instead of being an instrument for socioeconomic change, has been dominated by coalitions of interests accommodated by the use of public funds to provide private goods. This has enabled the middle class to monopolize what sanitation services the state has provided because the urban poor, despite their political participation, have not been able to exert sufficient pressure to force governments to effectively implement policies designed to improve their living conditions. The consequence is that public health and environmental policies have frequently become exercises in crisis intervention rather than preventive measures that benefit the health and well-being of the whole urban population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Urbanization SAGE

Indian cities, sanitation and the state: the politics of the failure to provide

Environment and Urbanization , Volume 23 (1): 14 – Apr 1, 2011

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References (43)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2011 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).
ISSN
0956-2478
eISSN
1746-0301
DOI
10.1177/0956247810396277
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The environmental problems confronting Indian cities today have arisen because millions of people have been forced to live in illegal settlements that lack adequate sanitation and other basic urban services. This is the result of two factors. The first is the legacy of the colonial city characterized by inequitable access to sanitation services, a failure to manage urban growth and the proliferation of slums, and the inadequate funding of urban governments. The second is the nature of the post-colonial state, which, instead of being an instrument for socioeconomic change, has been dominated by coalitions of interests accommodated by the use of public funds to provide private goods. This has enabled the middle class to monopolize what sanitation services the state has provided because the urban poor, despite their political participation, have not been able to exert sufficient pressure to force governments to effectively implement policies designed to improve their living conditions. The consequence is that public health and environmental policies have frequently become exercises in crisis intervention rather than preventive measures that benefit the health and well-being of the whole urban population.

Journal

Environment and UrbanizationSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2011

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