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Improved Productivity Means Increased Profitability

Improved Productivity Means Increased Profitability Distinguished Guest Editorial Improved Productivity Means Increased Profitability CARL M. FRANKLIN, Ph.D. Black and Decker Professor of Management University of Baltimore Retiring Editor, The American Journal of Small Business Virtually everyone who goes into business seeks some kind of net economic gain. Some seek direct gains through operation of enterprises which are required to make a profit - maybe not in each accounting period - but certainly over the life of the activity. Those who seek indirect gains may deliberately operate their businesses at a loss in order to take advantage of tax savings. Nevertheless, ALL BUSINESSES, LARGE AND SMALL, WHICH DO NOT YIELD NET ECONOMIC GAINS, SOONER OR LATER GO OUT OF EXISTENCE!! Why? Simply because nobody loves a loser - especially bankers, trade creditors, customers, and investors. Without support from those groups, no profits will be made. Without profits no business can survive. Without a good rate of productivity, a business will at best have only a low rate of profitability. Consequently, it behooves everyone who owns, manages, works for and may be otherwise involved with a business to take never-ending action which IMPROVES PRODUCTIVITY AND INCREASES PROFITA­ BILITY!!! Unfortunately, too many people do not understand that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

Improved Productivity Means Increased Profitability

American Journal of Small Business , Volume 7 (4): 3 – Apr 1, 1983

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1983 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225878300700401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Distinguished Guest Editorial Improved Productivity Means Increased Profitability CARL M. FRANKLIN, Ph.D. Black and Decker Professor of Management University of Baltimore Retiring Editor, The American Journal of Small Business Virtually everyone who goes into business seeks some kind of net economic gain. Some seek direct gains through operation of enterprises which are required to make a profit - maybe not in each accounting period - but certainly over the life of the activity. Those who seek indirect gains may deliberately operate their businesses at a loss in order to take advantage of tax savings. Nevertheless, ALL BUSINESSES, LARGE AND SMALL, WHICH DO NOT YIELD NET ECONOMIC GAINS, SOONER OR LATER GO OUT OF EXISTENCE!! Why? Simply because nobody loves a loser - especially bankers, trade creditors, customers, and investors. Without support from those groups, no profits will be made. Without profits no business can survive. Without a good rate of productivity, a business will at best have only a low rate of profitability. Consequently, it behooves everyone who owns, manages, works for and may be otherwise involved with a business to take never-ending action which IMPROVES PRODUCTIVITY AND INCREASES PROFITA­ BILITY!!! Unfortunately, too many people do not understand that

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1983

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