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Imatinib Mesylate: Past Successes and Future Challenges in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors:

Imatinib Mesylate: Past Successes and Future Challenges in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal... Just over a decade ago, gastrointestinal tumours were a poorly understood mesenchymal neoplasm unsuccessfully treated with chemotherapy. Cytotoxic therapy for advanced disease yielded response rates of 10% and median survival of just 18 months. However, the discovery of KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) mutations as oncogenic drivers of most gastrointestinal tumours, paved the way for targeted therapy. Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, produces a clinical benefit rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease) of more than 80% in metastatic setting and a median survival of 57 months. Imatinib is now also approved in adult patients following resection of KIT-positive GIST. Major insights into the mechanism of action of imatinib, unique pharmacokinetics, drug resistance, and management of low grade but chronic adverse effects continue to be made. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology SAGE

Imatinib Mesylate: Past Successes and Future Challenges in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors:

Imatinib Mesylate: Past Successes and Future Challenges in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors:

Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology , Volume 5: 1 – Nov 9, 2011

Abstract

Just over a decade ago, gastrointestinal tumours were a poorly understood mesenchymal neoplasm unsuccessfully treated with chemotherapy. Cytotoxic therapy for advanced disease yielded response rates of 10% and median survival of just 18 months. However, the discovery of KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) mutations as oncogenic drivers of most gastrointestinal tumours, paved the way for targeted therapy. Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, produces a clinical benefit rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease) of more than 80% in metastatic setting and a median survival of 57 months. Imatinib is now also approved in adult patients following resection of KIT-positive GIST. Major insights into the mechanism of action of imatinib, unique pharmacokinetics, drug resistance, and management of low grade but chronic adverse effects continue to be made.

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Ltd unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
eISSN
1179-5549
DOI
10.4137/cmo.s4259
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Just over a decade ago, gastrointestinal tumours were a poorly understood mesenchymal neoplasm unsuccessfully treated with chemotherapy. Cytotoxic therapy for advanced disease yielded response rates of 10% and median survival of just 18 months. However, the discovery of KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) mutations as oncogenic drivers of most gastrointestinal tumours, paved the way for targeted therapy. Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, produces a clinical benefit rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease) of more than 80% in metastatic setting and a median survival of 57 months. Imatinib is now also approved in adult patients following resection of KIT-positive GIST. Major insights into the mechanism of action of imatinib, unique pharmacokinetics, drug resistance, and management of low grade but chronic adverse effects continue to be made.

Journal

Clinical Medicine Insights: OncologySAGE

Published: Nov 9, 2011

Keywords: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor; imatinib; metastatic; adjuvant

References