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Human Foragers: Searchers by Nature and Experience:

Human Foragers: Searchers by Nature and Experience: Diverse studies of human foraging have revealed behavioral strategies that may have evolved as adaptations for foraging. Here, we used an outdoor experimental search task to explore the effect of three sources of information on participants’ performance: (i) information obtained directly from performing a search, (ii) information obtained prior to testing in the form of a distilled snippet of knowledge intended to experimentally simulate information acquired culturally about the environment, and (iii) information obtained from experience of foraging for natural resources for economic gain. We found that (i) immediate searching experience improved performance from the beginning to the end of the short, 2-min task, (ii) information priming improved performance notably from the very beginning of the task, and (iii) natural resource foraging experience improved performance to a lesser extent. Our results highlight the role of culturally transmitted information as well as the presence of mechanisms to rapidly integrate and implement new information into searching choices, which ultimately influence performance in a foraging task. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Human Foragers: Searchers by Nature and Experience:

Human Foragers: Searchers by Nature and Experience:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 17 (2): 1 – Apr 22, 2019

Abstract

Diverse studies of human foraging have revealed behavioral strategies that may have evolved as adaptations for foraging. Here, we used an outdoor experimental search task to explore the effect of three sources of information on participants’ performance: (i) information obtained directly from performing a search, (ii) information obtained prior to testing in the form of a distilled snippet of knowledge intended to experimentally simulate information acquired culturally about the environment, and (iii) information obtained from experience of foraging for natural resources for economic gain. We found that (i) immediate searching experience improved performance from the beginning to the end of the short, 2-min task, (ii) information priming improved performance notably from the very beginning of the task, and (iii) natural resource foraging experience improved performance to a lesser extent. Our results highlight the role of culturally transmitted information as well as the presence of mechanisms to rapidly integrate and implement new information into searching choices, which ultimately influence performance in a foraging task.

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/1474704919839729
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Diverse studies of human foraging have revealed behavioral strategies that may have evolved as adaptations for foraging. Here, we used an outdoor experimental search task to explore the effect of three sources of information on participants’ performance: (i) information obtained directly from performing a search, (ii) information obtained prior to testing in the form of a distilled snippet of knowledge intended to experimentally simulate information acquired culturally about the environment, and (iii) information obtained from experience of foraging for natural resources for economic gain. We found that (i) immediate searching experience improved performance from the beginning to the end of the short, 2-min task, (ii) information priming improved performance notably from the very beginning of the task, and (iii) natural resource foraging experience improved performance to a lesser extent. Our results highlight the role of culturally transmitted information as well as the presence of mechanisms to rapidly integrate and implement new information into searching choices, which ultimately influence performance in a foraging task.

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Apr 22, 2019

Keywords: cultural transmission; information acquisition; large-scale tests; foraging experience; searching behavior

References