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How We Once Came to Fight a War on Poverty

How We Once Came to Fight a War on Poverty The National Welfare Rights Organization marching to end hunger, 1968. Fast food workers and community workers demonstrated outside of Jack in the Box and McDonald’s restaurants in Oakland, California, 2013. Special Collections and Archives, George Mason University Libraries, Jack John Orvis Rottier Collection 544692 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796014544692New Labor ForumPiven research-article2014 The Changing Faces of Poverty and Inequality New Labor Forum 2014, Vol. 23(3) 20 –25 How We Once Came to Copyright © 2014, The Murphy Institute, City University of New York Reprints and permissions: Fight a War on Poverty sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/1095796014544692 nlf.sagepub.com Frances Fox Piven Keywords poverty, social welfare, Democratic Party, community organizations, protest movement The fifty-year anniversary of Lyndon Baines teaching or preaching to them to change their Johnson’s declaration of a war on poverty has attitudes and behaviors regarding work and sparked a new round of right-wing attacks on school and childbearing. Too little was directed social policies for the poor. The arguments are toward the economic conditions these people familiar. Ronald Reagan set the tone with the faced, especially unemployment and low wages. quip, “We fought a war on poverty, and poverty There is a measure of truth in this last point. won.” Now it was people http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Labor Forum SAGE

How We Once Came to Fight a War on Poverty

New Labor Forum , Volume 23 (3): 6 – Sep 1, 2014

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2014, The Murphy Institute, City University of New York
ISSN
1095-7960
eISSN
1557-2978
DOI
10.1177/1095796014544692
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The National Welfare Rights Organization marching to end hunger, 1968. Fast food workers and community workers demonstrated outside of Jack in the Box and McDonald’s restaurants in Oakland, California, 2013. Special Collections and Archives, George Mason University Libraries, Jack John Orvis Rottier Collection 544692 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796014544692New Labor ForumPiven research-article2014 The Changing Faces of Poverty and Inequality New Labor Forum 2014, Vol. 23(3) 20 –25 How We Once Came to Copyright © 2014, The Murphy Institute, City University of New York Reprints and permissions: Fight a War on Poverty sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/1095796014544692 nlf.sagepub.com Frances Fox Piven Keywords poverty, social welfare, Democratic Party, community organizations, protest movement The fifty-year anniversary of Lyndon Baines teaching or preaching to them to change their Johnson’s declaration of a war on poverty has attitudes and behaviors regarding work and sparked a new round of right-wing attacks on school and childbearing. Too little was directed social policies for the poor. The arguments are toward the economic conditions these people familiar. Ronald Reagan set the tone with the faced, especially unemployment and low wages. quip, “We fought a war on poverty, and poverty There is a measure of truth in this last point. won.” Now it was people

Journal

New Labor ForumSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2014

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