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How cosmopolitanism reduces conflict: A broad reading of Kant’s third ingredient for peace

How cosmopolitanism reduces conflict: A broad reading of Kant’s third ingredient for peace Kant’s theory of peace has been reinterpreted under one of the most influential research programs of our times: The so-called democratic peace theory. In particular, the third ingredient of Kant’s “recipe” for peace —the cosmopolitan right to visit—has been recognized as a powerful and effective instrument to reduce militarized interstate conflicts. In the hands of political scientists, however, this ingredient has often become nothing more than a set of rules for securing and facilitating international trade and economic interdependence. This article argues that this narrow reading mistakes international trade as the essence of the third definitive article. Kant sees economic interdependence as a means to realize what cosmopolitan right is truly about, that is, the affirmation of a set of rules for protecting humans qua humans, the creation of communal bonds among individuals beyond national or group loyalties, and the promotion of a global moral conscience modeled on the natural rights of man. An accurate understanding of cosmopolitan right is essential to avoid the popular - yet mistaken - idea that Kant sees progress towards peace as possible without individuals’ and peoples’ moral progress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of International Political Theory SAGE

How cosmopolitanism reduces conflict: A broad reading of Kant’s third ingredient for peace

Journal of International Political Theory , Volume 14 (1): 18 – Feb 1, 2018

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References (37)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2017
ISSN
1755-0882
eISSN
1755-1722
DOI
10.1177/1755088217702528
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Kant’s theory of peace has been reinterpreted under one of the most influential research programs of our times: The so-called democratic peace theory. In particular, the third ingredient of Kant’s “recipe” for peace —the cosmopolitan right to visit—has been recognized as a powerful and effective instrument to reduce militarized interstate conflicts. In the hands of political scientists, however, this ingredient has often become nothing more than a set of rules for securing and facilitating international trade and economic interdependence. This article argues that this narrow reading mistakes international trade as the essence of the third definitive article. Kant sees economic interdependence as a means to realize what cosmopolitan right is truly about, that is, the affirmation of a set of rules for protecting humans qua humans, the creation of communal bonds among individuals beyond national or group loyalties, and the promotion of a global moral conscience modeled on the natural rights of man. An accurate understanding of cosmopolitan right is essential to avoid the popular - yet mistaken - idea that Kant sees progress towards peace as possible without individuals’ and peoples’ moral progress.

Journal

Journal of International Political TheorySAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2018

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