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Homicide in the Workplace

Homicide in the Workplace Homicide in the Workplace THE U.S. EXPERIENCE, 1980-1988 by E. Lynn Jenkins, MA, Larry A. Layne, MA, and Suzanne M. Kisner, as omicide was the third leading cause of States from 1980 to 1985 indicated that 41% of all occupational injury death in the United females who died as a result of workplace trauma were homicide victims (Bell, 1991). H States from 1980 to 1988. Twelve per­ cent of all occupational injury deaths in the period METHODS were homicides. Only motor vehicle (23%) and The NTOF surveillance system collects death machine related (13%) incidents accounted for certificates from the 50 states, New York City, and more deaths. the District of Columbia for all deaths to persons 16 State specific studies in North Carolina years or older for whom an external cause of death (Sniezek, 1989) and Texas (CDC, 1985) yielded was reported according to the International Classi­ similar results, with homicide accounting for 12% fication of Diseases, Ninth Revision (lCD-9) (WHO, and 14% of the occupational injury deaths in those states, respectively. The initial Texas study in­ 1977), and for whom the certifier noted a positive cluded only males. A subsequent analysis of data the "Injury at Work?" item. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1992 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999204000502
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Homicide in the Workplace THE U.S. EXPERIENCE, 1980-1988 by E. Lynn Jenkins, MA, Larry A. Layne, MA, and Suzanne M. Kisner, as omicide was the third leading cause of States from 1980 to 1985 indicated that 41% of all occupational injury death in the United females who died as a result of workplace trauma were homicide victims (Bell, 1991). H States from 1980 to 1988. Twelve per­ cent of all occupational injury deaths in the period METHODS were homicides. Only motor vehicle (23%) and The NTOF surveillance system collects death machine related (13%) incidents accounted for certificates from the 50 states, New York City, and more deaths. the District of Columbia for all deaths to persons 16 State specific studies in North Carolina years or older for whom an external cause of death (Sniezek, 1989) and Texas (CDC, 1985) yielded was reported according to the International Classi­ similar results, with homicide accounting for 12% fication of Diseases, Ninth Revision (lCD-9) (WHO, and 14% of the occupational injury deaths in those states, respectively. The initial Texas study in­ 1977), and for whom the certifier noted a positive cluded only males. A subsequent analysis of data the "Injury at Work?" item.

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: May 1, 1992

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