Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Hispanic Business Grows in Size and Sophistication

Hispanic Business Grows in Size and Sophistication Hispanic Business Grows In Size and Sophistication* BY STEPHEN E. NORDLINGER Washington Bureau of The Sun Washington - It is no longer just tortillas, tacos and enchiladas. Those basic components of Mexican food, served at such spots as Tippy's Taco House and EI Mariachi, once were the mainstay of Hispanic business in this country, but times are changing. While Mexican restaurants are still proliferating from coast to coast, Hispanic business is also coming to mean banking, auto dealerships, machine shops, road and building construction, furniture making, adver­ tising and radio and television. Behind the population explosion that is making Hispanics the country's fastest growing minority, is a surge in Hispanic business that is having more and more of an impact on the nation's economy. The political power derived from the rapid population rise is going to be backed by the economic clout of expanding businesses. "It used to be, 10 years ago, that Hispanic businesses were mostly mom and pop affairs, a restaurant, a grocery or variety store, but they are getting a lot larger and more sophisticated," said Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, which supports Hispanic interests. "The Hispanic market is getting big, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

Hispanic Business Grows in Size and Sophistication

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/hispanic-business-grows-in-size-and-sophistication-ahYrzGIZtq
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1981 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225878100600103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hispanic Business Grows In Size and Sophistication* BY STEPHEN E. NORDLINGER Washington Bureau of The Sun Washington - It is no longer just tortillas, tacos and enchiladas. Those basic components of Mexican food, served at such spots as Tippy's Taco House and EI Mariachi, once were the mainstay of Hispanic business in this country, but times are changing. While Mexican restaurants are still proliferating from coast to coast, Hispanic business is also coming to mean banking, auto dealerships, machine shops, road and building construction, furniture making, adver­ tising and radio and television. Behind the population explosion that is making Hispanics the country's fastest growing minority, is a surge in Hispanic business that is having more and more of an impact on the nation's economy. The political power derived from the rapid population rise is going to be backed by the economic clout of expanding businesses. "It used to be, 10 years ago, that Hispanic businesses were mostly mom and pop affairs, a restaurant, a grocery or variety store, but they are getting a lot larger and more sophisticated," said Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, which supports Hispanic interests. "The Hispanic market is getting big,

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 1981

There are no references for this article.