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Happy Together? The Peer Effects of Dual Enrollment Students on Community College Student Outcomes

Happy Together? The Peer Effects of Dual Enrollment Students on Community College Student Outcomes Nationally, 15% of first-time community college students were high school dual enrollment (DE) students, which raises concerns about how high school peers might influence college enrollees. Using administrative data from a large state community college system, we examine whether being exposed to a higher percentage of DE peers in entry-level (gateway) math and English courses influences non-DE enrollees’ performance. Using a two-way fixed effects model, our results indicate that college enrollees exposed to a higher proportion of DE peers had lower pass rates and grades in gateway courses, and higher course repetition rates. Supplemental student-level analysis suggests that greater exposure to DE peers during a student's initial semester in college reduces next-term college persistence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Educational Research Journal SAGE

Happy Together? The Peer Effects of Dual Enrollment Students on Community College Student Outcomes

American Educational Research Journal , Volume OnlineFirst: 1 – Jan 1, 2021

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2021 AERA
ISSN
0002-8312
eISSN
1935-1011
DOI
10.3102/00028312211008490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nationally, 15% of first-time community college students were high school dual enrollment (DE) students, which raises concerns about how high school peers might influence college enrollees. Using administrative data from a large state community college system, we examine whether being exposed to a higher percentage of DE peers in entry-level (gateway) math and English courses influences non-DE enrollees’ performance. Using a two-way fixed effects model, our results indicate that college enrollees exposed to a higher proportion of DE peers had lower pass rates and grades in gateway courses, and higher course repetition rates. Supplemental student-level analysis suggests that greater exposure to DE peers during a student's initial semester in college reduces next-term college persistence.

Journal

American Educational Research JournalSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2021

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