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Grief after Brain Injury: A Validation of the Brain Injury Grief Inventory (BIGI)

Grief after Brain Injury: A Validation of the Brain Injury Grief Inventory (BIGI) The objective of this article is to determine whether a new questionnaire (the BIGI) is a valid and reliable measure of grief in a brain injured population. Design: Within group, questionnaire based prospective study of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The BIGI was compared with other questionnaires to determine the construct validity and repeated to assess test re-test reliability. Results: The loss scale of the BIGI had a higher internal consistency than the adjustment scale. Test re-test reliability for both variables was good. Younger individuals appeared to be more likely to show a positive adjustment to a TBI than older individuals. Women reported higher scores for loss than men. On the adjustment scale, married individuals achieved lower scores than single persons. Conclusions: The BIGI scales of loss and adjustment were associated with a number of the other measures. The loss scale had a higher internal consistency than the adjustment scale. The clinical utility of the scale is discussed and further research suggested. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Illness, Crisis & Loss SAGE

Grief after Brain Injury: A Validation of the Brain Injury Grief Inventory (BIGI)

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References (38)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2005 SAGE Publications
ISSN
1054-1373
eISSN
1552-6968
DOI
10.1177/105413730501300304
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The objective of this article is to determine whether a new questionnaire (the BIGI) is a valid and reliable measure of grief in a brain injured population. Design: Within group, questionnaire based prospective study of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The BIGI was compared with other questionnaires to determine the construct validity and repeated to assess test re-test reliability. Results: The loss scale of the BIGI had a higher internal consistency than the adjustment scale. Test re-test reliability for both variables was good. Younger individuals appeared to be more likely to show a positive adjustment to a TBI than older individuals. Women reported higher scores for loss than men. On the adjustment scale, married individuals achieved lower scores than single persons. Conclusions: The BIGI scales of loss and adjustment were associated with a number of the other measures. The loss scale had a higher internal consistency than the adjustment scale. The clinical utility of the scale is discussed and further research suggested.

Journal

Illness, Crisis & LossSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2005

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