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Gene Families, Epistasis and the Amino Acid Preferences of Protein Homologs:

Gene Families, Epistasis and the Amino Acid Preferences of Protein Homologs: In order to preserve structure and function, proteins tend to preferentially conserve amino acids at particular sites along the sequence. Because mutations can affect structure and function, the question arises whether the preference of a protein site for a particular amino acid varies between protein homologs, and to what extent that variation depends on sequence divergence. Answering these questions can help in the development of models of sequence evolution, as well as provide insights on the dependence of the fitness effects of mutations on the genetic background of sequences, a phenomenon known as epistasis. Here, I comment on recent computational work providing a systematic analysis of the extent to which the amino acid preferences of proteins depend on the background mutations of protein homologs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Bioinformatics SAGE

Gene Families, Epistasis and the Amino Acid Preferences of Protein Homologs:

Evolutionary Bioinformatics , Volume 15: 1 – Aug 15, 2019

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SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Ltd unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
N/A
eISSN
1176-9343
DOI
10.1177/1176934319870485
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Abstract

In order to preserve structure and function, proteins tend to preferentially conserve amino acids at particular sites along the sequence. Because mutations can affect structure and function, the question arises whether the preference of a protein site for a particular amino acid varies between protein homologs, and to what extent that variation depends on sequence divergence. Answering these questions can help in the development of models of sequence evolution, as well as provide insights on the dependence of the fitness effects of mutations on the genetic background of sequences, a phenomenon known as epistasis. Here, I comment on recent computational work providing a systematic analysis of the extent to which the amino acid preferences of proteins depend on the background mutations of protein homologs.

Journal

Evolutionary BioinformaticsSAGE

Published: Aug 15, 2019

Keywords: Gene families; site-specific amino acid preferences; protein biophysics; mutational trajectories; genetic background

References