Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

FRPs — The Environmental Agenda

FRPs — The Environmental Agenda Fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) are increasingly being used in construction due to their light weight, ease of installation, low maintenance, tailor made properties, and corrosion resistance. The UK FRP industry produces 240,000 tonnes of products a year with 11% of this being for the construction industry in a variety of structural and on-structural applications. Products made from FRP materials can offer significant environmental benefits, for example, FRPs used in bridges can reduce the overall weight of the structure and so offer reduced transport and installation impacts. However, although the in service environmental benefits of composites are known, there is far less understanding of the environmental and social implications associated with the manufacture of FRP materials and products.Current and impending waste management legislation will put more pressure on the industry to address the options available for dealing with FRP waste. Such waste legislation focuses on dealing with waste through the w aste hierarchy and will therefore put more pressure on solving FRP waste management through recycling and reuse. At present the most common disposal method for UK FRP waste is landfill. To assist in the transition from disposal in landfill to recycling, the FRP industry needs to consider designing materials and components for easier deconstruction, reuse and recycling at the end of the product life.This paper will highlight the key issues affecting the FRP industry, taking a cradle to grave approach and assessing the environmental impacts at each stage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Structural Engineering SAGE

FRPs — The Environmental Agenda

Advances in Structural Engineering , Volume 13 (5): 9 – Oct 1, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/frps-the-environmental-agenda-OxMKuL0iiM
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2010 SAGE Publications
ISSN
1369-4332
eISSN
2048-4011
DOI
10.1260/1369-4332.13.5.783
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) are increasingly being used in construction due to their light weight, ease of installation, low maintenance, tailor made properties, and corrosion resistance. The UK FRP industry produces 240,000 tonnes of products a year with 11% of this being for the construction industry in a variety of structural and on-structural applications. Products made from FRP materials can offer significant environmental benefits, for example, FRPs used in bridges can reduce the overall weight of the structure and so offer reduced transport and installation impacts. However, although the in service environmental benefits of composites are known, there is far less understanding of the environmental and social implications associated with the manufacture of FRP materials and products.Current and impending waste management legislation will put more pressure on the industry to address the options available for dealing with FRP waste. Such waste legislation focuses on dealing with waste through the w aste hierarchy and will therefore put more pressure on solving FRP waste management through recycling and reuse. At present the most common disposal method for UK FRP waste is landfill. To assist in the transition from disposal in landfill to recycling, the FRP industry needs to consider designing materials and components for easier deconstruction, reuse and recycling at the end of the product life.This paper will highlight the key issues affecting the FRP industry, taking a cradle to grave approach and assessing the environmental impacts at each stage.

Journal

Advances in Structural EngineeringSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2010

There are no references for this article.