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From the Editorial Team

From the Editorial Team 840782 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796019840782New Labor Forum editorial2019 New Labor Forum 2019, Vol. 28(2) 5 –6 From the Editorial Team Copyright © 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies Article reuse guidelines: sagepub.com/journals-permissions https://doi.org/10.1177/1095796019840782 DOI: 10.1177/1095796019840782 journals.sagepub.com/home/nlf Not since the 1960s has a cohort of young peo- way the U.S. government treats immigrants in ple felt so drawn to a radical critique of American this country, both those already here and those society. Back then, it was a college-age popula- trying to get here. For a long time, the issue of tion growing up in a period of post-war prosper- mass migration has been addressed as a matter of ity. Today, it is a somewhat older cohort in their law and law enforcement, which it is. But its mid-twenties to thirties, coming of age in far roots go much deeper. Gabrielle Clark examines more austere circumstances. In both cases, how- both the “push” and “pull” forces that have for ever, a sizeable fraction of American youth did decades generated a vast flow of migrants from and are now again concluding that something is the Global South. And she pinpoints an emerging profoundly wrong in the “homeland.” political economy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Labor Forum SAGE

From the Editorial Team

New Labor Forum , Volume 28 (2): 2 – May 1, 2019

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
ISSN
1095-7960
eISSN
1557-2978
DOI
10.1177/1095796019840782
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

840782 NLFXXX10.1177/1095796019840782New Labor Forum editorial2019 New Labor Forum 2019, Vol. 28(2) 5 –6 From the Editorial Team Copyright © 2019, The Murphy Institute, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies Article reuse guidelines: sagepub.com/journals-permissions https://doi.org/10.1177/1095796019840782 DOI: 10.1177/1095796019840782 journals.sagepub.com/home/nlf Not since the 1960s has a cohort of young peo- way the U.S. government treats immigrants in ple felt so drawn to a radical critique of American this country, both those already here and those society. Back then, it was a college-age popula- trying to get here. For a long time, the issue of tion growing up in a period of post-war prosper- mass migration has been addressed as a matter of ity. Today, it is a somewhat older cohort in their law and law enforcement, which it is. But its mid-twenties to thirties, coming of age in far roots go much deeper. Gabrielle Clark examines more austere circumstances. In both cases, how- both the “push” and “pull” forces that have for ever, a sizeable fraction of American youth did decades generated a vast flow of migrants from and are now again concluding that something is the Global South. And she pinpoints an emerging profoundly wrong in the “homeland.” political economy

Journal

New Labor ForumSAGE

Published: May 1, 2019

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