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Female Workplace Homicides

Female Workplace Homicides Female Workplace Homicides AN INTEGRATIVE RESEARCH REVIEW by Pamela Fox Levin, MS, RN, Jeanne Beauchamp Hewitt, MS, RN, and Susan Terry Misner, MS, RN omicide at work is an emerging concern than that of women, aggregated data obscure for occupational health nurses. Approxi­ clear gender differences (Davis, 1987; Sniezek, mately 42% of fatal occupational inju­ 1989). ries for women are due to murder, compared to Although 13% of fatal occupational injuries 11% for men (CDC, 1990). Between 1980 and are due to homicides for men and women com­ 1985, murder on the job was the leading cause of bined, homicide accounts for a disproportionate fatal injuries for women, compared to the third share of fatal occupational injuries for women­ leading cause for men. During this period, 42% (NIOSH, 1989). Each year approximately workplace homicide of women accounted for 150 women are murdered at work (Bell, 1991). 25,787 years of potential life lost (CDC, 1990). Little has been done to prevent violent acts in the Any worker, especially if involved with ex­ workplace (Dietz, 1987; Erickson, 1980; Hales, change of money, is a potential victim of a violent 1988). act. The leading causes of the estimated annual While occupational health http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1992 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999204000504
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Female Workplace Homicides AN INTEGRATIVE RESEARCH REVIEW by Pamela Fox Levin, MS, RN, Jeanne Beauchamp Hewitt, MS, RN, and Susan Terry Misner, MS, RN omicide at work is an emerging concern than that of women, aggregated data obscure for occupational health nurses. Approxi­ clear gender differences (Davis, 1987; Sniezek, mately 42% of fatal occupational inju­ 1989). ries for women are due to murder, compared to Although 13% of fatal occupational injuries 11% for men (CDC, 1990). Between 1980 and are due to homicides for men and women com­ 1985, murder on the job was the leading cause of bined, homicide accounts for a disproportionate fatal injuries for women, compared to the third share of fatal occupational injuries for women­ leading cause for men. During this period, 42% (NIOSH, 1989). Each year approximately workplace homicide of women accounted for 150 women are murdered at work (Bell, 1991). 25,787 years of potential life lost (CDC, 1990). Little has been done to prevent violent acts in the Any worker, especially if involved with ex­ workplace (Dietz, 1987; Erickson, 1980; Hales, change of money, is a potential victim of a violent 1988). act. The leading causes of the estimated annual While occupational health

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: May 1, 1992

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