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Exploring Intersectional Identity in Black Deaf Women: The Complexity of the Lived Experience in College

Exploring Intersectional Identity in Black Deaf Women: The Complexity of the Lived Experience in... Although the concept of intersectionality has gained widespread attention in social science research, there remains a significant gap related to the impact of intersectionality on identity formation for persons negotiating multiple marginalized social identities. This gap is especially significant among Black women who are Deaf—two groups who face significant education disparities and are largely absent in the research literature. In response to these gaps, we conducted a qualitative study with Black Deaf women (n = 25) on a college campus to better understand the lived experiences of this population and its impact on their intersectional identity. Many of the participants expressed, despite problems related to gender, race, and disability, the number of Black Deaf women on campus made them feel that they had a support network of allies. Implications for future research and social work practice are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Affilia SAGE

Exploring Intersectional Identity in Black Deaf Women: The Complexity of the Lived Experience in College

Affilia , Volume 36 (4): 22 – Nov 1, 2021

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2021
ISSN
0886-1099
eISSN
1552-3020
DOI
10.1177/0886109920985769
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although the concept of intersectionality has gained widespread attention in social science research, there remains a significant gap related to the impact of intersectionality on identity formation for persons negotiating multiple marginalized social identities. This gap is especially significant among Black women who are Deaf—two groups who face significant education disparities and are largely absent in the research literature. In response to these gaps, we conducted a qualitative study with Black Deaf women (n = 25) on a college campus to better understand the lived experiences of this population and its impact on their intersectional identity. Many of the participants expressed, despite problems related to gender, race, and disability, the number of Black Deaf women on campus made them feel that they had a support network of allies. Implications for future research and social work practice are discussed.

Journal

AffiliaSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2021

References