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Errata

Errata performance cannot be adequately described in the simple terms that have been used in the past. After two articles about policy issues and two about individuals and their learning, we close with two articles about the teachers themselves. Allie Clemans, Amanda Berry and John Loughran look at the professional learning of teachers who undertake leadership roles in schools, and how it can be enhanced by collaboration and sharing with others in leadership positions. ‘Case writing’ involved sharing, documenting, presenting and publishing accounts of the experiences of such teachers in professional learning and school leadership. The themes they identified range far and wide, from providing leadership to resistant colleagues to dealing with their own feelings of vulnerability. The need to write up and share their knowledge and experience enhanced their learning in many ways, but they were still reluctant to share their experiences more widely, to their school colleagues or to other school leaders. Perhaps the value of such sharing needs to become a more important focus for professional learning programs. In a very welcome contribution from Turkey, Altay Eren examines the levels of interest in teaching among prospective teachers. Consistent with international findings, he was able to identify three components of their interest: subject interest, didactic interest and (broader) educational interest. Specifically, this study found that those with different levels of overall interest in teaching had different profiles among these three dimensions. Furthermore, the evidence shows that the three dimensions of interest relate in different ways to other measures known to be predictive of a future in teaching: students’ satisfaction with their career choice, their professional development aspirations and their own estimates of their likely persistence in teaching careers. The findings confirm the multidimensional nature of interest in teaching and suggest that all three dimensions need to be taken into account in policy considerations relating to teacher preparation and selection. Although broadly consistent with international work in the field, these specific findings invite replication in different cultural contexts. Thank you to all these authors for their contributions to this, the final issue of the AJE published wholly under the ACER banner. We look forward to a bright future with the guiding hand of SAGE Publications to assist us. Glenn Rowley Australian Council for Educational Research Shaw, T., & Cross, D., ‘The clustering of bullying and cyberbullying behaviours within Australian schools’, Australian Journal of Education, 56(2), pp. 142–162. Some equations on page 147 were altered in error. The σ and π symbols dropped out of an equation, the preceding text in that sentence as well as the sentence immediately following. The text should read: 2 2 2 2 …‘individuals in the same school (σ ) and … ICC = σ / (σ + σ ) … e g g e 2 2 … logistic distribution with a constant variance of σ = π / 3 = 3.29 … The editor and the Journal regret these errors. Editorial 225 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Education SAGE

Errata

Australian Journal of Education , Volume 56 (3): 1 – Nov 1, 2012

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2012 Australian Council for Educational Research
ISSN
0004-9441
eISSN
2050-5884
DOI
10.1177/000494411205600302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

performance cannot be adequately described in the simple terms that have been used in the past. After two articles about policy issues and two about individuals and their learning, we close with two articles about the teachers themselves. Allie Clemans, Amanda Berry and John Loughran look at the professional learning of teachers who undertake leadership roles in schools, and how it can be enhanced by collaboration and sharing with others in leadership positions. ‘Case writing’ involved sharing, documenting, presenting and publishing accounts of the experiences of such teachers in professional learning and school leadership. The themes they identified range far and wide, from providing leadership to resistant colleagues to dealing with their own feelings of vulnerability. The need to write up and share their knowledge and experience enhanced their learning in many ways, but they were still reluctant to share their experiences more widely, to their school colleagues or to other school leaders. Perhaps the value of such sharing needs to become a more important focus for professional learning programs. In a very welcome contribution from Turkey, Altay Eren examines the levels of interest in teaching among prospective teachers. Consistent with international findings, he was able to identify three components of their interest: subject interest, didactic interest and (broader) educational interest. Specifically, this study found that those with different levels of overall interest in teaching had different profiles among these three dimensions. Furthermore, the evidence shows that the three dimensions of interest relate in different ways to other measures known to be predictive of a future in teaching: students’ satisfaction with their career choice, their professional development aspirations and their own estimates of their likely persistence in teaching careers. The findings confirm the multidimensional nature of interest in teaching and suggest that all three dimensions need to be taken into account in policy considerations relating to teacher preparation and selection. Although broadly consistent with international work in the field, these specific findings invite replication in different cultural contexts. Thank you to all these authors for their contributions to this, the final issue of the AJE published wholly under the ACER banner. We look forward to a bright future with the guiding hand of SAGE Publications to assist us. Glenn Rowley Australian Council for Educational Research Shaw, T., & Cross, D., ‘The clustering of bullying and cyberbullying behaviours within Australian schools’, Australian Journal of Education, 56(2), pp. 142–162. Some equations on page 147 were altered in error. The σ and π symbols dropped out of an equation, the preceding text in that sentence as well as the sentence immediately following. The text should read: 2 2 2 2 …‘individuals in the same school (σ ) and … ICC = σ / (σ + σ ) … e g g e 2 2 … logistic distribution with a constant variance of σ = π / 3 = 3.29 … The editor and the Journal regret these errors. Editorial 225

Journal

Australian Journal of EducationSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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