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Emotion-related impulsivity: Testing a model of arousal effects on cognitive control:

Emotion-related impulsivity: Testing a model of arousal effects on cognitive control: The trait-based tendency to respond rashly to emotions is robustly tied to many forms of psychopathology and poor behavioural outcomes, including aggression and suicidality. Researchers have found associations between response inhibition and emotion-related impulsivity; however, effect sizes are often small. Because emotion-related impulsivity emerges in the context of heightened positive and negative emotions, arousal is a candidate trigger of impulsivity. The goals of the present study were to (1) replicate the association between emotion-related impulsivity and response inhibition, and (2) test whether emotion-related impulsivity is associated with arousal-induced decays in response inhibition performance. Participants (N = 55) completed a self-report measure of emotion-related impulsivity, and then completed a computer-based response inhibition task (the antisaccade task, in which participants must make a rapid saccadic eye movement away from a cue rather than toward it) before and after a well-validated stress induction (the Trier Social Stress Test). Psychophysiological indices of arousal were measured throughout the session. Findings provide partial support for the association between emotion-related impulsivity and pre-stress response inhibition. Contrary to hypotheses, emotion-related impulsivity did not interact with arousal to predict post-stress response inhibition performance after controlling for pre-stress response inhibition performance. Future research is needed to consider clinical samples and to assess whether emotion-related impulsivity is related to deficits in other facets of cognitive control and decision-making. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain and Neuroscience Advances SAGE

Emotion-related impulsivity: Testing a model of arousal effects on cognitive control:

Emotion-related impulsivity: Testing a model of arousal effects on cognitive control:

Brain and Neuroscience Advances , Volume 6: 1 – Feb 24, 2022

Abstract

The trait-based tendency to respond rashly to emotions is robustly tied to many forms of psychopathology and poor behavioural outcomes, including aggression and suicidality. Researchers have found associations between response inhibition and emotion-related impulsivity; however, effect sizes are often small. Because emotion-related impulsivity emerges in the context of heightened positive and negative emotions, arousal is a candidate trigger of impulsivity. The goals of the present study were to (1) replicate the association between emotion-related impulsivity and response inhibition, and (2) test whether emotion-related impulsivity is associated with arousal-induced decays in response inhibition performance. Participants (N = 55) completed a self-report measure of emotion-related impulsivity, and then completed a computer-based response inhibition task (the antisaccade task, in which participants must make a rapid saccadic eye movement away from a cue rather than toward it) before and after a well-validated stress induction (the Trier Social Stress Test). Psychophysiological indices of arousal were measured throughout the session. Findings provide partial support for the association between emotion-related impulsivity and pre-stress response inhibition. Contrary to hypotheses, emotion-related impulsivity did not interact with arousal to predict post-stress response inhibition performance after controlling for pre-stress response inhibition performance. Future research is needed to consider clinical samples and to assess whether emotion-related impulsivity is related to deficits in other facets of cognitive control and decision-making.

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Ltd and British Neuroscience Association, unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
2398-2128
eISSN
2398-2128
DOI
10.1177/23982128221079572
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The trait-based tendency to respond rashly to emotions is robustly tied to many forms of psychopathology and poor behavioural outcomes, including aggression and suicidality. Researchers have found associations between response inhibition and emotion-related impulsivity; however, effect sizes are often small. Because emotion-related impulsivity emerges in the context of heightened positive and negative emotions, arousal is a candidate trigger of impulsivity. The goals of the present study were to (1) replicate the association between emotion-related impulsivity and response inhibition, and (2) test whether emotion-related impulsivity is associated with arousal-induced decays in response inhibition performance. Participants (N = 55) completed a self-report measure of emotion-related impulsivity, and then completed a computer-based response inhibition task (the antisaccade task, in which participants must make a rapid saccadic eye movement away from a cue rather than toward it) before and after a well-validated stress induction (the Trier Social Stress Test). Psychophysiological indices of arousal were measured throughout the session. Findings provide partial support for the association between emotion-related impulsivity and pre-stress response inhibition. Contrary to hypotheses, emotion-related impulsivity did not interact with arousal to predict post-stress response inhibition performance after controlling for pre-stress response inhibition performance. Future research is needed to consider clinical samples and to assess whether emotion-related impulsivity is related to deficits in other facets of cognitive control and decision-making.

Journal

Brain and Neuroscience AdvancesSAGE

Published: Feb 24, 2022

Keywords: Emotion; impulsivity; stress; cognitive control; emotion-related impulsivity; urgency

References