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Emotion-driven problem behaviour: The predictive utility of positive and negative urgency:

Emotion-driven problem behaviour: The predictive utility of positive and negative urgency: Impulsive urgency describes the tendency to act rashly when experiencing extreme emotions. This Australian study aimed to investigate the predictive utility of impulsivity, including impulsive urgency (positive and negative), across a range of problem behaviours. Data from two community samples, one retrospective (n = 281) and one current (n = 604), were analysed using hierarchical regression to determine which facets of impulsivity, as assessed with a comprehensive scale (i.e. negative urgency, positive urgency, lack or premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking), best predicted a series of problem behaviours (i.e. problem gambling, disorderly alcohol use, online gambling disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder behaviours, and social media addiction). The impulsive urgency facets were shown to be significant predictors across the behaviours examined. More specifically, negative urgency was the strongest predictor of disorderly alcohol use, obsessive-compulsive disorder behaviours, and social media addiction. Positive urgency was associated with problem gambling and online gambling disorder behaviours. These findings suggest that impulsive urgency is a key contributing factor in many behavioural problems and that the valence of the urgency is an important consideration when addressing a broad range of psychopathologies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain and Neuroscience Advances SAGE

Emotion-driven problem behaviour: The predictive utility of positive and negative urgency:

Emotion-driven problem behaviour: The predictive utility of positive and negative urgency:

Brain and Neuroscience Advances , Volume 6: 1 – Feb 24, 2022

Abstract

Impulsive urgency describes the tendency to act rashly when experiencing extreme emotions. This Australian study aimed to investigate the predictive utility of impulsivity, including impulsive urgency (positive and negative), across a range of problem behaviours. Data from two community samples, one retrospective (n = 281) and one current (n = 604), were analysed using hierarchical regression to determine which facets of impulsivity, as assessed with a comprehensive scale (i.e. negative urgency, positive urgency, lack or premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking), best predicted a series of problem behaviours (i.e. problem gambling, disorderly alcohol use, online gambling disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder behaviours, and social media addiction). The impulsive urgency facets were shown to be significant predictors across the behaviours examined. More specifically, negative urgency was the strongest predictor of disorderly alcohol use, obsessive-compulsive disorder behaviours, and social media addiction. Positive urgency was associated with problem gambling and online gambling disorder behaviours. These findings suggest that impulsive urgency is a key contributing factor in many behavioural problems and that the valence of the urgency is an important consideration when addressing a broad range of psychopathologies.

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Ltd and British Neuroscience Association, unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
2398-2128
eISSN
2398-2128
DOI
10.1177/23982128221079573
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Impulsive urgency describes the tendency to act rashly when experiencing extreme emotions. This Australian study aimed to investigate the predictive utility of impulsivity, including impulsive urgency (positive and negative), across a range of problem behaviours. Data from two community samples, one retrospective (n = 281) and one current (n = 604), were analysed using hierarchical regression to determine which facets of impulsivity, as assessed with a comprehensive scale (i.e. negative urgency, positive urgency, lack or premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking), best predicted a series of problem behaviours (i.e. problem gambling, disorderly alcohol use, online gambling disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder behaviours, and social media addiction). The impulsive urgency facets were shown to be significant predictors across the behaviours examined. More specifically, negative urgency was the strongest predictor of disorderly alcohol use, obsessive-compulsive disorder behaviours, and social media addiction. Positive urgency was associated with problem gambling and online gambling disorder behaviours. These findings suggest that impulsive urgency is a key contributing factor in many behavioural problems and that the valence of the urgency is an important consideration when addressing a broad range of psychopathologies.

Journal

Brain and Neuroscience AdvancesSAGE

Published: Feb 24, 2022

Keywords: Impulsivity; negative urgency; problem gambling; alcohol abuse; obsessive-compulsive disorder; social media addiction

References