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Editorial

Editorial Environment and Urbanization AsiA 11(2) 179–182, 2020 © 2020 National institute of Urban Affairs (NiUA) Reprints and permissions: in.sagepub.com/journals-permissions-india DOi: 10.1177/0975425320946002 journals.sagepub.com/home/eua Since early 2020, Asia, alongside rest of the world, finds itself in the midst of a public health crisis due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Whilst Europe and North America remain the epicentre of the pandemic, in Asia, major metropolitan and economic hubs, such as Mumbai, Delhi, Dhaka and Karachi, have notably emerged as COVID-19 hot spots. In these high-density urban environments, poverty and population concentrated in slums have been major factors complicating efforts to contain the spread of the virus, thus revealing some of the patterns of unequal and exclusionary growth to have shaped urban environments in recent decades. Also, the lockdown imposed in several countries has impacted the livelihood of the people adversely. India offers a classic example of reverse migration where loss of livelihood resulted in mass exodus of millions of people by foot to reach their native villages, many succumbing to the adversity. Whilst Asia’s metropolitan cities have long been conceptualized as ‘engines of economic growth’, the situation of the pandemic also compels us to recognize them as social and functional http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Urbanization Asia SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2020 National Institute of Urban Affairs
ISSN
0975-4253
eISSN
0975-4709
DOI
10.1177/0975425320946002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environment and Urbanization AsiA 11(2) 179–182, 2020 © 2020 National institute of Urban Affairs (NiUA) Reprints and permissions: in.sagepub.com/journals-permissions-india DOi: 10.1177/0975425320946002 journals.sagepub.com/home/eua Since early 2020, Asia, alongside rest of the world, finds itself in the midst of a public health crisis due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Whilst Europe and North America remain the epicentre of the pandemic, in Asia, major metropolitan and economic hubs, such as Mumbai, Delhi, Dhaka and Karachi, have notably emerged as COVID-19 hot spots. In these high-density urban environments, poverty and population concentrated in slums have been major factors complicating efforts to contain the spread of the virus, thus revealing some of the patterns of unequal and exclusionary growth to have shaped urban environments in recent decades. Also, the lockdown imposed in several countries has impacted the livelihood of the people adversely. India offers a classic example of reverse migration where loss of livelihood resulted in mass exodus of millions of people by foot to reach their native villages, many succumbing to the adversity. Whilst Asia’s metropolitan cities have long been conceptualized as ‘engines of economic growth’, the situation of the pandemic also compels us to recognize them as social and functional

Journal

Environment and Urbanization AsiaSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2020

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