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Editorial

Editorial One way to judge research into Australian educational policy and practice is to measure whether and how well it informs educational policy and practice. This is no mean feat when you account in the first place for the many intersecting policies and practices that, through their interplay, shape the ‘educational’ field, and when measurement can be a tricky business in the second. It’s safe to say, however, that educational research, at least in this issue of the Australian Journal of Education, addresses matters to do with teaching, from the mechanics that determine the appointment and retention of teaching staff in schools to larger questions about the way education does and should work in a globalised market economy. It’s safe to say, as well, that educational research addresses matters to do with learners and learning, and with the measurement of educational performance in some shape or form. Two papers in this issue address matters to do with teaching, in terms of the supply of personnel. In ‘Cloning their own: Aspirant principals and the school- based selection game’, Peter Gronn and Kathy Lacey report on their research on school principal recruitment in three Australian states.Their research focuses on the ways school-based http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Education SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2006 Australian Council for Educational Research
ISSN
0004-9441
eISSN
2050-5884
DOI
10.1177/000494410605000201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One way to judge research into Australian educational policy and practice is to measure whether and how well it informs educational policy and practice. This is no mean feat when you account in the first place for the many intersecting policies and practices that, through their interplay, shape the ‘educational’ field, and when measurement can be a tricky business in the second. It’s safe to say, however, that educational research, at least in this issue of the Australian Journal of Education, addresses matters to do with teaching, from the mechanics that determine the appointment and retention of teaching staff in schools to larger questions about the way education does and should work in a globalised market economy. It’s safe to say, as well, that educational research addresses matters to do with learners and learning, and with the measurement of educational performance in some shape or form. Two papers in this issue address matters to do with teaching, in terms of the supply of personnel. In ‘Cloning their own: Aspirant principals and the school- based selection game’, Peter Gronn and Kathy Lacey report on their research on school principal recruitment in three Australian states.Their research focuses on the ways school-based

Journal

Australian Journal of EducationSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2006

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