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Communication on Both Sides of the Mirror: Helping a Family Cope With a Traumatic Brain Injury

Communication on Both Sides of the Mirror: Helping a Family Cope With a Traumatic Brain Injury This case describes a family’s struggle with a child’s traumatic brain injury (TBI). The family had difficulty discussing how the injury had changed their lives. Emotions were often expressed as explosive outbursts. Initially, the father refused to participate in counseling.Various treatments were tried, but family therapy was needed. Because of the father’s resistance, family sessions initially involved only the siblings. Aspects of filial play therapy were also introduced. Specifically, the parents viewed portions of their children’s sessions from behind a one-way mirror. While behind the mirror, the parents consulted with another therapist about what was going on, how they could generalize treatment, and how TBIs affect children’s social/ emotional functioning. The effects of TBIs on families were also discussed, and the parents’ began to openly discuss their concerns. Eventually, family therapy included everyone. Throughout treatment, it was clear that important changes had occurred on both sides of the mirror. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and Families SAGE

Communication on Both Sides of the Mirror: Helping a Family Cope With a Traumatic Brain Injury

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References (9)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1066-4807
eISSN
1552-3950
DOI
10.1177/1066480704122012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This case describes a family’s struggle with a child’s traumatic brain injury (TBI). The family had difficulty discussing how the injury had changed their lives. Emotions were often expressed as explosive outbursts. Initially, the father refused to participate in counseling.Various treatments were tried, but family therapy was needed. Because of the father’s resistance, family sessions initially involved only the siblings. Aspects of filial play therapy were also introduced. Specifically, the parents viewed portions of their children’s sessions from behind a one-way mirror. While behind the mirror, the parents consulted with another therapist about what was going on, how they could generalize treatment, and how TBIs affect children’s social/ emotional functioning. The effects of TBIs on families were also discussed, and the parents’ began to openly discuss their concerns. Eventually, family therapy included everyone. Throughout treatment, it was clear that important changes had occurred on both sides of the mirror.

Journal

The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and FamiliesSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2004

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