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Chapter 4: Speech Production and Assessment:

Chapter 4: Speech Production and Assessment: CHAPTER 4 SPEECH PRODUCTION AND ASSESSMENT BASIC SPEECH PROCESSES The physiology of speech is an extremely complicated subject and this chapter is simply intended to provide a brief guide to the foundation of articulatory phonetics (cf. FANT 1957, 1958). In the production of speech sounds, the primary acoustic energy comes from an exhaled airstream, which in the larynx passes through the gap (glottis) between the vocal folds or, as they are also known, the vocal cords. A speech sound may be voiced or unvoiced. The voiced sounds-vowels and voiced consonants-are produced with glottal tone and the unvoiced sounds- unvoiced consonants-are formed without glottal tone. The vibration of the vocal folds is not dependent on motor innervation. Instead, the folds open and close in a cycle of vibration induced by the exhaled airstream. The vocal folds thus form a mechanical oscillatory system in that the suction caused by the exhaled air tends to close the folds either partly or entirely, where- upon the subglottal pressure increases and the folds are forced open again. In this way, the combination of the suction from the airstream and the elasticity of the primary vocal folds gives rise to a pulsating flow of air, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Radiologica. Diagnosis SAGE

Chapter 4: Speech Production and Assessment:

Acta Radiologica. Diagnosis , Volume 7 (276_suppl): 5 – Aug 30, 2016

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by The Foundation Acta Radiologica
ISSN
0567-8056
eISSN
ISSN: 0567-8056
DOI
10.1177/0284185168007S27605
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 4 SPEECH PRODUCTION AND ASSESSMENT BASIC SPEECH PROCESSES The physiology of speech is an extremely complicated subject and this chapter is simply intended to provide a brief guide to the foundation of articulatory phonetics (cf. FANT 1957, 1958). In the production of speech sounds, the primary acoustic energy comes from an exhaled airstream, which in the larynx passes through the gap (glottis) between the vocal folds or, as they are also known, the vocal cords. A speech sound may be voiced or unvoiced. The voiced sounds-vowels and voiced consonants-are produced with glottal tone and the unvoiced sounds- unvoiced consonants-are formed without glottal tone. The vibration of the vocal folds is not dependent on motor innervation. Instead, the folds open and close in a cycle of vibration induced by the exhaled airstream. The vocal folds thus form a mechanical oscillatory system in that the suction caused by the exhaled air tends to close the folds either partly or entirely, where- upon the subglottal pressure increases and the folds are forced open again. In this way, the combination of the suction from the airstream and the elasticity of the primary vocal folds gives rise to a pulsating flow of air,

Journal

Acta Radiologica. DiagnosisSAGE

Published: Aug 30, 2016

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