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Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis in Cancer: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Study Investigating Risk Factors and Contemporary Trends in Management:

Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis in Cancer: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Study Investigating... Objectives: Central venous access is needed to facilitate chemotherapy for many cancer patients. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CVCT) is a major complication that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. We sought to explore the rate of CVCT in a general cancer population in Australia and to identify factors associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Design: This is a multi-centre retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: We analysed key patient, treatment, and cancer-related factors for 317 patients with cancer and central venous catheters inserted for systemic therapy. Main outcome measures: Symptomatic CVCT confirmed with imaging and management of patients with CVCT. Results: A total of 402 cases of central line insertion were analysed. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis occurred in 24 patients (6.0%). Having a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC; HR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.28-11.19, P = .02) compared with an implantable port and a body mass index of ⩾25.0 kg/m2 (HR = 3.60, 95% CI = 1.31-9.85, P = .01) were independently associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis was managed mostly with removal of the catheter (19 of 24 cases) and anticoagulation, including direct-acting oral anticoagulants in 5 patients. Conclusions: This work explored rates of CVCT in a general cancer population, observing increased rates in those with PICCs or increased body mass index. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology SAGE

Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis in Cancer: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Study Investigating Risk Factors and Contemporary Trends in Management:

Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis in Cancer: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Study Investigating Risk Factors and Contemporary Trends in Management:

Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology , Volume 14: 1 – Aug 30, 2020

Abstract

Objectives: Central venous access is needed to facilitate chemotherapy for many cancer patients. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CVCT) is a major complication that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. We sought to explore the rate of CVCT in a general cancer population in Australia and to identify factors associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Design: This is a multi-centre retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: We analysed key patient, treatment, and cancer-related factors for 317 patients with cancer and central venous catheters inserted for systemic therapy. Main outcome measures: Symptomatic CVCT confirmed with imaging and management of patients with CVCT. Results: A total of 402 cases of central line insertion were analysed. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis occurred in 24 patients (6.0%). Having a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC; HR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.28-11.19, P = .02) compared with an implantable port and a body mass index of ⩾25.0 kg/m2 (HR = 3.60, 95% CI = 1.31-9.85, P = .01) were independently associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis was managed mostly with removal of the catheter (19 of 24 cases) and anticoagulation, including direct-acting oral anticoagulants in 5 patients. Conclusions: This work explored rates of CVCT in a general cancer population, observing increased rates in those with PICCs or increased body mass index.

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SAGE
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Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Ltd unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
eISSN
1179-5549
DOI
10.1177/1179554920953097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives: Central venous access is needed to facilitate chemotherapy for many cancer patients. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CVCT) is a major complication that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. We sought to explore the rate of CVCT in a general cancer population in Australia and to identify factors associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Design: This is a multi-centre retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: We analysed key patient, treatment, and cancer-related factors for 317 patients with cancer and central venous catheters inserted for systemic therapy. Main outcome measures: Symptomatic CVCT confirmed with imaging and management of patients with CVCT. Results: A total of 402 cases of central line insertion were analysed. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis occurred in 24 patients (6.0%). Having a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC; HR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.28-11.19, P = .02) compared with an implantable port and a body mass index of ⩾25.0 kg/m2 (HR = 3.60, 95% CI = 1.31-9.85, P = .01) were independently associated with increased risk of thrombosis. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis was managed mostly with removal of the catheter (19 of 24 cases) and anticoagulation, including direct-acting oral anticoagulants in 5 patients. Conclusions: This work explored rates of CVCT in a general cancer population, observing increased rates in those with PICCs or increased body mass index.

Journal

Clinical Medicine Insights: OncologySAGE

Published: Aug 30, 2020

Keywords: Adverse event management; breast cancer; pancreatic cancer; colorectal cancer; gastric cancer; acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL); acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

References