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Book Review: This Land is Your Land:

Book Review: This Land is Your Land: Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2007. 5(3): 605-611 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review This Land is Your Land A review of David Sloan Wilson’s, Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin’s Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives. Random House, Inc.: New York, 2007, 390pp. $ 24.00. ISBN: 978-0-385-34021-2 (hardcover) David P. Mindell, Museum of Zoology and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Email: mindell@umich.edu When it comes to understanding the natural world, from plants to planets, nothing beats a scientific approach. Unless, of course, the understanding concerns the relations among humans, gods, and religions, in which case it seems the rules for understanding our world change, and for many, supernatural explanations and received wisdom suddenly become compelling. This paradox, the selective use and disuse of a scientific world view, has been famously rationalized in Pascal’s Wager. The 17th century mathematician and defender of Christianity theorized that assuming God’s existence, and living in faithful accord, was clearly the best bet. If you are right, he supposed, you gain salvation, and if you are wrong, well, at least you haven’t lost anything. Whereas, if you assume that God doesn’t exist you gain nothing, regardless of whether http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Book Review: This Land is Your Land:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 5 (3): 1 – Jul 1, 2007

Book Review: This Land is Your Land:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 5 (3): 1 – Jul 1, 2007

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2007. 5(3): 605-611 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review This Land is Your Land A review of David Sloan Wilson’s, Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin’s Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives. Random House, Inc.: New York, 2007, 390pp. $ 24.00. ISBN: 978-0-385-34021-2 (hardcover) David P. Mindell, Museum of Zoology and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Email: mindell@umich.edu When it comes to understanding the natural world, from plants to planets, nothing beats a scientific approach. Unless, of course, the understanding concerns the relations among humans, gods, and religions, in which case it seems the rules for understanding our world change, and for many, supernatural explanations and received wisdom suddenly become compelling. This paradox, the selective use and disuse of a scientific world view, has been famously rationalized in Pascal’s Wager. The 17th century mathematician and defender of Christianity theorized that assuming God’s existence, and living in faithful accord, was clearly the best bet. If you are right, he supposed, you gain salvation, and if you are wrong, well, at least you haven’t lost anything. Whereas, if you assume that God doesn’t exist you gain nothing, regardless of whether

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SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470490700500309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2007. 5(3): 605-611 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review This Land is Your Land A review of David Sloan Wilson’s, Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin’s Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives. Random House, Inc.: New York, 2007, 390pp. $ 24.00. ISBN: 978-0-385-34021-2 (hardcover) David P. Mindell, Museum of Zoology and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Email: mindell@umich.edu When it comes to understanding the natural world, from plants to planets, nothing beats a scientific approach. Unless, of course, the understanding concerns the relations among humans, gods, and religions, in which case it seems the rules for understanding our world change, and for many, supernatural explanations and received wisdom suddenly become compelling. This paradox, the selective use and disuse of a scientific world view, has been famously rationalized in Pascal’s Wager. The 17th century mathematician and defender of Christianity theorized that assuming God’s existence, and living in faithful accord, was clearly the best bet. If you are right, he supposed, you gain salvation, and if you are wrong, well, at least you haven’t lost anything. Whereas, if you assume that God doesn’t exist you gain nothing, regardless of whether

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2007

References