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Book Review: The Student Experience of Higher Education

Book Review: The Student Experience of Higher Education 304 Australian Journal of Education chapters, practicalities later. Given the audience of practitioners for whom he writes, this is unfortunate because he is going to lose impatient or sceptical readers straightaway. It is under­ standable that Jaques, being English, emphasizes the 'Tavistock Model' as an explanation for group relations. I like the Tavistock approach, but readers steeped in the positivism of the American view of group dynamics may be unfamiliar with the psychodynamic assumptions of Freud and Bion. A second cultural problem occurs with engineering and physical science staff for whom the emphasis on covert feelings in group interaction may lack credibility. A few pages on the Bales Interaction Analysis System does not remedy this. What does retrieve the reader's interest is a splendid lengthy quote (12 pages) on 'Some Properties of Groups' by Malcolm Knowles, followed by cogent and useful sections on student learning styles and on communi­ cation. The guts of the book, plainly receiving the benefit of the author's thorough immersion in British research in higher education, is contained in three central chapters, 'Tasks and Techniques', 'The Tutor's Job', and 'Learning Groups in Context'. The 'Tasks' chapter presents concise and coherent descriptions of 16 techniques for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Education SAGE

Book Review: The Student Experience of Higher Education

Australian Journal of Education , Volume 30 (3): 2 – Nov 1, 1986

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1986 Australian Council for Educational Research
ISSN
0004-9441
eISSN
2050-5884
DOI
10.1177/000494418603000310
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

304 Australian Journal of Education chapters, practicalities later. Given the audience of practitioners for whom he writes, this is unfortunate because he is going to lose impatient or sceptical readers straightaway. It is under­ standable that Jaques, being English, emphasizes the 'Tavistock Model' as an explanation for group relations. I like the Tavistock approach, but readers steeped in the positivism of the American view of group dynamics may be unfamiliar with the psychodynamic assumptions of Freud and Bion. A second cultural problem occurs with engineering and physical science staff for whom the emphasis on covert feelings in group interaction may lack credibility. A few pages on the Bales Interaction Analysis System does not remedy this. What does retrieve the reader's interest is a splendid lengthy quote (12 pages) on 'Some Properties of Groups' by Malcolm Knowles, followed by cogent and useful sections on student learning styles and on communi­ cation. The guts of the book, plainly receiving the benefit of the author's thorough immersion in British research in higher education, is contained in three central chapters, 'Tasks and Techniques', 'The Tutor's Job', and 'Learning Groups in Context'. The 'Tasks' chapter presents concise and coherent descriptions of 16 techniques for

Journal

Australian Journal of EducationSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1986

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