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Book Review: The Science of Observational Methods:

Book Review: The Science of Observational Methods: Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2009. 7(1): 116-117 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review The Science of Observational Methods rd A review of Paul Martin and Patrick Bateson, Measuring Behaviour: An Introductory Guide (3 ed.). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007, 176 pp., US$45.00, ISBN 978-0521535632 (paperback). Renee Robinette Ha, Department of Psychology, Animal Behavior Program, University of Washington, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. E-mail: robinet@u.washington.edu. Paul Martin and Patrick Bateson have updated their guide to behavioral biology, and it continues to be a gem. In a mere 176 pages, they manage to address critical topics in the design and execution of a behavioral study. Obviously, some details are left to the reader, but Measuring Behaviour provides good resources for those requiring additional information. Most importantly, they hit the key ingredients of a well thought-out behavioral study; their little book will be sufficient for many undergraduates engaged in studies for coursework, or those learning the fundamentals of behavioral science. Although intended primarily for research in animal behavior, Measuring Behaviour will also be useful for evolutionary psychologists studying Homo sapiens in any “natural” setting. It can serve as an excellent introduction to the design of behavioral projects for graduate students, too, and I have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Book Review: The Science of Observational Methods:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 7 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2009

Book Review: The Science of Observational Methods:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 7 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2009

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2009. 7(1): 116-117 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review The Science of Observational Methods rd A review of Paul Martin and Patrick Bateson, Measuring Behaviour: An Introductory Guide (3 ed.). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007, 176 pp., US$45.00, ISBN 978-0521535632 (paperback). Renee Robinette Ha, Department of Psychology, Animal Behavior Program, University of Washington, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. E-mail: robinet@u.washington.edu. Paul Martin and Patrick Bateson have updated their guide to behavioral biology, and it continues to be a gem. In a mere 176 pages, they manage to address critical topics in the design and execution of a behavioral study. Obviously, some details are left to the reader, but Measuring Behaviour provides good resources for those requiring additional information. Most importantly, they hit the key ingredients of a well thought-out behavioral study; their little book will be sufficient for many undergraduates engaged in studies for coursework, or those learning the fundamentals of behavioral science. Although intended primarily for research in animal behavior, Measuring Behaviour will also be useful for evolutionary psychologists studying Homo sapiens in any “natural” setting. It can serve as an excellent introduction to the design of behavioral projects for graduate students, too, and I have

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470490900700115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2009. 7(1): 116-117 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review The Science of Observational Methods rd A review of Paul Martin and Patrick Bateson, Measuring Behaviour: An Introductory Guide (3 ed.). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007, 176 pp., US$45.00, ISBN 978-0521535632 (paperback). Renee Robinette Ha, Department of Psychology, Animal Behavior Program, University of Washington, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. E-mail: robinet@u.washington.edu. Paul Martin and Patrick Bateson have updated their guide to behavioral biology, and it continues to be a gem. In a mere 176 pages, they manage to address critical topics in the design and execution of a behavioral study. Obviously, some details are left to the reader, but Measuring Behaviour provides good resources for those requiring additional information. Most importantly, they hit the key ingredients of a well thought-out behavioral study; their little book will be sufficient for many undergraduates engaged in studies for coursework, or those learning the fundamentals of behavioral science. Although intended primarily for research in animal behavior, Measuring Behaviour will also be useful for evolutionary psychologists studying Homo sapiens in any “natural” setting. It can serve as an excellent introduction to the design of behavioral projects for graduate students, too, and I have

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2009

References