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Book Review: The Instant Economist

Book Review: The Instant Economist keep people working together and control costs while implementing professional management systems; how to use planning systems to prepare for change, antici­ pate problems, and minimize unpleasant surprises; and a final chapter on how CEO's should develop new skills and take on new roles as their companies grow. A very good annotated bibliography is also included and identifies some cur­ rent sources for further reading and research. The book's intended audience appears to be the practicing entrepreneur be­ cause it covers only the essentials of various management concepts. The college teacher could be a good secondary market for this book because it offers many pragmatic examples and approaches to solving daily problems of small firms, and the book could certainly be used as a supplementary text, because it is logically organized and flows smoothly. Flamholtz's book does have some minor weaknesses which the college teacher could eliminate with additional class handouts and supplementary readings chosen from the book's annotated bibliography. These additional assignments will help the student fill the following knowledge gaps not sufficiently explained in the book: 1.) characteristics that differentiate entrepreneurs from small busi­ ness owners, 2.) steps of the entrepreneurial process, 3.) other models of organi­ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

Book Review: The Instant Economist

American Journal of Small Business , Volume 11 (4): 3 – Apr 1, 1987

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1987 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225878701100406
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

keep people working together and control costs while implementing professional management systems; how to use planning systems to prepare for change, antici­ pate problems, and minimize unpleasant surprises; and a final chapter on how CEO's should develop new skills and take on new roles as their companies grow. A very good annotated bibliography is also included and identifies some cur­ rent sources for further reading and research. The book's intended audience appears to be the practicing entrepreneur be­ cause it covers only the essentials of various management concepts. The college teacher could be a good secondary market for this book because it offers many pragmatic examples and approaches to solving daily problems of small firms, and the book could certainly be used as a supplementary text, because it is logically organized and flows smoothly. Flamholtz's book does have some minor weaknesses which the college teacher could eliminate with additional class handouts and supplementary readings chosen from the book's annotated bibliography. These additional assignments will help the student fill the following knowledge gaps not sufficiently explained in the book: 1.) characteristics that differentiate entrepreneurs from small busi­ ness owners, 2.) steps of the entrepreneurial process, 3.) other models of organi­

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1987

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