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Book Review: The Environment for Entrepreneurship

Book Review: The Environment for Entrepreneurship Book and Software Reviews The Environment for Entrepreneurship, edited by Calvin A. Kent. Lex­ ington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company, 1984. 191 pp., $21.00 This book is comprised of a series of essays (originally lectures) on entrepre­ neurship by eight distinguished authors, primarily academicians (who are busi­ ness-oriented) but including a businessman and a former government official. Most of the book describes entrepreneurship in the United States, but there are references throughout to other countries, and chapters 8 and 9 deal with Europe (especially England) and the Iron Curtain countries, respectively. This excellent book would be useful reading for business persons and government officials who are interested and involved in economic development. It has many implications and applications in that field because of the well-known importance of entrepre­ neurs as generators of jobs, economic activity and innovations. The current entrepreneurial revolution in the United States and, increasingly, in other parts of the world has caught the imagination of both people and govern­ ments with its potential for providing good incomes and a sense of economic independence for everyone regardless of their age, sex, race, creed, or nation­ ality. This book points to environmental influences that impact on entrepreneurs, with special emphasis on the ways in which government affects them. Its conclu­ sions and recommendations on government's role are thought-provoking and pro­ gressive, though I did not agree with all of them. As the book notes, the fast increasing respectability of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs can be attributed to a backlash against the tax, regulation and other disadvantages that small busi­ ness has suffered in past years but that are slowly being corrected now. All in all, I enjoyed reading this book on entrepreneurship-one of my favorite subjects­ and it will be one of the books that I will suggest to some of my associates in business, government and education. Key opinion leaders, particularly in big business and big government, can gain a better understanding of the subject by reading this book. This new understanding will in tum help to accelerate the revitalization of the U.S. economy and ease the current painful transition from a manufacturing to a retail/service base. My own experience in the small business field for over 25 years, almost 15 of those at SBA, has shown me that entrepre­ neurs have much of value to offer all people throughout the world as we move inexorably toward a global economy and "one world". Reviewed by: Burton A. Scott Business Development Officer U.S. Small Business Administration Atlanta, Georgia, USA Spring, 1987 55 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

Book Review: The Environment for Entrepreneurship

American Journal of Small Business , Volume 11 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1987

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1987 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225878701100404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book and Software Reviews The Environment for Entrepreneurship, edited by Calvin A. Kent. Lex­ ington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company, 1984. 191 pp., $21.00 This book is comprised of a series of essays (originally lectures) on entrepre­ neurship by eight distinguished authors, primarily academicians (who are busi­ ness-oriented) but including a businessman and a former government official. Most of the book describes entrepreneurship in the United States, but there are references throughout to other countries, and chapters 8 and 9 deal with Europe (especially England) and the Iron Curtain countries, respectively. This excellent book would be useful reading for business persons and government officials who are interested and involved in economic development. It has many implications and applications in that field because of the well-known importance of entrepre­ neurs as generators of jobs, economic activity and innovations. The current entrepreneurial revolution in the United States and, increasingly, in other parts of the world has caught the imagination of both people and govern­ ments with its potential for providing good incomes and a sense of economic independence for everyone regardless of their age, sex, race, creed, or nation­ ality. This book points to environmental influences that impact on entrepreneurs, with special emphasis on the ways in which government affects them. Its conclu­ sions and recommendations on government's role are thought-provoking and pro­ gressive, though I did not agree with all of them. As the book notes, the fast increasing respectability of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs can be attributed to a backlash against the tax, regulation and other disadvantages that small busi­ ness has suffered in past years but that are slowly being corrected now. All in all, I enjoyed reading this book on entrepreneurship-one of my favorite subjects­ and it will be one of the books that I will suggest to some of my associates in business, government and education. Key opinion leaders, particularly in big business and big government, can gain a better understanding of the subject by reading this book. This new understanding will in tum help to accelerate the revitalization of the U.S. economy and ease the current painful transition from a manufacturing to a retail/service base. My own experience in the small business field for over 25 years, almost 15 of those at SBA, has shown me that entrepre­ neurs have much of value to offer all people throughout the world as we move inexorably toward a global economy and "one world". Reviewed by: Burton A. Scott Business Development Officer U.S. Small Business Administration Atlanta, Georgia, USA Spring, 1987 55

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1987

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