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Book Review: System of Justice: An Introduction to the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

Book Review: System of Justice: An Introduction to the Criminal Justice... BOOK REVIEWS 59 court proceedings; and the contentious issue of the high rates of incarceration of Aboriginal people. Foley shows how the accuracy of evidence or statements, taken during police interrogation, can also be severely undermined by special handicaps of illiteracy, hearing loss, fatigue, ill health and intoxication of the Aboriginal suspects. These problems ultimately reverberate in the criminal courts, frequently resulting in Aboriginal defendants confessing to crimes they did not commit, not understanding their legal rights and being asked to give evidence on matters contrary to customary law. Foley provides a useful summary of rules for police interrogation of Aboriginal suspects in each State and Territory. He also outlines recent developments in law reform, and in the employment of liaison units and Aboriginal police or police-aides as a means of overcoming some of the difficulties innate in cross-cultural policing. Ligertwood, Maddock and Eggleston call for a modification of the whole Australian criminal justice system "to take account of Aboriginal attitudes" and perceptions of law. If this collection has a central thesis it is that, only by a simultaneous assertion through both legal and political channels, can Aboriginal rights be preserved. Law reform, concludes Foley, is only one important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Book Review: System of Justice: An Introduction to the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/000486588501800108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS 59 court proceedings; and the contentious issue of the high rates of incarceration of Aboriginal people. Foley shows how the accuracy of evidence or statements, taken during police interrogation, can also be severely undermined by special handicaps of illiteracy, hearing loss, fatigue, ill health and intoxication of the Aboriginal suspects. These problems ultimately reverberate in the criminal courts, frequently resulting in Aboriginal defendants confessing to crimes they did not commit, not understanding their legal rights and being asked to give evidence on matters contrary to customary law. Foley provides a useful summary of rules for police interrogation of Aboriginal suspects in each State and Territory. He also outlines recent developments in law reform, and in the employment of liaison units and Aboriginal police or police-aides as a means of overcoming some of the difficulties innate in cross-cultural policing. Ligertwood, Maddock and Eggleston call for a modification of the whole Australian criminal justice system "to take account of Aboriginal attitudes" and perceptions of law. If this collection has a central thesis it is that, only by a simultaneous assertion through both legal and political channels, can Aboriginal rights be preserved. Law reform, concludes Foley, is only one important

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1985

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