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Book Review: Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo:

Book Review: Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo: Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2011. 9(2): 186-188 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo A review of Martin D. Jaffe, The Primal Instinct: How Biological Security Motivates Behavior, Promotes Morality, Determines Authority, and Explains Our Search for a God. Prometheus Books: Amherst, 2010, 120pp., US$20.00, ISBN 978-1-61614-207-0 (paperback). Marissa G. Petroff, University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL. Email: mgpetroff@gmail.com (Corresponding author). Peter K. Jonason, University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL Inspired by the events of 9/11, Dr. Martin Jaffe took a journey of self-reflection in search of what makes him tick. After many months he concluded that life’s motivating factors are physical security and self-esteem. Finding it difficult to incorporate these two factors, he narrowed his focus to the concept of security, which integrates both the physical and the intellectual. Jaffee addresses topics such as attachment, morality, and authority in order to make his case that the purported effects of religion, God, and prayer are really placebo effects. In some ways, this conclusion surprises the reader. The initial chapters before he drops this bomb, seem to build a completely reasonable case of the role of self- medications through the use of placebos http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Book Review: Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo:

Book Review: Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 9 (2): 1 – Apr 1, 2011

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2011. 9(2): 186-188 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo A review of Martin D. Jaffe, The Primal Instinct: How Biological Security Motivates Behavior, Promotes Morality, Determines Authority, and Explains Our Search for a God. Prometheus Books: Amherst, 2010, 120pp., US$20.00, ISBN 978-1-61614-207-0 (paperback). Marissa G. Petroff, University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL. Email: mgpetroff@gmail.com (Corresponding author). Peter K. Jonason, University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL Inspired by the events of 9/11, Dr. Martin Jaffe took a journey of self-reflection in search of what makes him tick. After many months he concluded that life’s motivating factors are physical security and self-esteem. Finding it difficult to incorporate these two factors, he narrowed his focus to the concept of security, which integrates both the physical and the intellectual. Jaffee addresses topics such as attachment, morality, and authority in order to make his case that the purported effects of religion, God, and prayer are really placebo effects. In some ways, this conclusion surprises the reader. The initial chapters before he drops this bomb, seem to build a completely reasonable case of the role of self- medications through the use of placebos

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SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470491100900204
Publisher site
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Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2011. 9(2): 186-188 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review Not Omnipotent, but a Placebo A review of Martin D. Jaffe, The Primal Instinct: How Biological Security Motivates Behavior, Promotes Morality, Determines Authority, and Explains Our Search for a God. Prometheus Books: Amherst, 2010, 120pp., US$20.00, ISBN 978-1-61614-207-0 (paperback). Marissa G. Petroff, University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL. Email: mgpetroff@gmail.com (Corresponding author). Peter K. Jonason, University of South Alabama, Department of Psychology, Mobile, AL Inspired by the events of 9/11, Dr. Martin Jaffe took a journey of self-reflection in search of what makes him tick. After many months he concluded that life’s motivating factors are physical security and self-esteem. Finding it difficult to incorporate these two factors, he narrowed his focus to the concept of security, which integrates both the physical and the intellectual. Jaffee addresses topics such as attachment, morality, and authority in order to make his case that the purported effects of religion, God, and prayer are really placebo effects. In some ways, this conclusion surprises the reader. The initial chapters before he drops this bomb, seem to build a completely reasonable case of the role of self- medications through the use of placebos

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2011

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