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Book Review: Not Father's Fatherhood Book:

Book Review: Not Father's Fatherhood Book: Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2010. 8(2): 336-339 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review Not Father’s Fatherhood Book A Review of Peter B. Gray and Kermyt G. Anderson, Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 2010, 320 pp., US$23.96, ISBN 978-0674048690 (hardcover). Drew H. Bailey, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. Email: dhbd45@mail.missouri.edu (corresponding author). Benjamin Winegard, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. David C. Geary, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. Introduction and Summary In many Western families and among policy makers that seek to influence the behavior of parents in these families, the consistent finding that women invest more in the care of their children than men is a seemingly constant source of concern and consternation. The clarifying light of an evolutionary analysis places these concerns in perspective and allows us to more fully understand why these sex differences are found in every culture in which they have been studied and helps us to address the equally important question of why the differences are not larger (Geary, 2010). The latter is the real riddle, as men’s investment in their children is unusual among mammals and especially http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolutionary Psychology SAGE

Book Review: Not Father's Fatherhood Book:

Book Review: Not Father's Fatherhood Book:

Evolutionary Psychology , Volume 8 (2): 1 – Apr 1, 2010

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2010. 8(2): 336-339 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review Not Father’s Fatherhood Book A Review of Peter B. Gray and Kermyt G. Anderson, Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 2010, 320 pp., US$23.96, ISBN 978-0674048690 (hardcover). Drew H. Bailey, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. Email: dhbd45@mail.missouri.edu (corresponding author). Benjamin Winegard, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. David C. Geary, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. Introduction and Summary In many Western families and among policy makers that seek to influence the behavior of parents in these families, the consistent finding that women invest more in the care of their children than men is a seemingly constant source of concern and consternation. The clarifying light of an evolutionary analysis places these concerns in perspective and allows us to more fully understand why these sex differences are found in every culture in which they have been studied and helps us to address the equally important question of why the differences are not larger (Geary, 2010). The latter is the real riddle, as men’s investment in their children is unusual among mammals and especially

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 by SAGE Publications Inc., unless otherwise noted. Manuscript content on this site is licensed under Creative Commons Licenses
ISSN
1474-7049
eISSN
1474-7049
DOI
10.1177/147470491000800215
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Evolutionary Psychology www.epjournal.net – 2010. 8(2): 336-339 ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ Book Review Not Father’s Fatherhood Book A Review of Peter B. Gray and Kermyt G. Anderson, Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 2010, 320 pp., US$23.96, ISBN 978-0674048690 (hardcover). Drew H. Bailey, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. Email: dhbd45@mail.missouri.edu (corresponding author). Benjamin Winegard, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. David C. Geary, Department of Psychological Sciences, The University of Missouri, Columbia, USA. Introduction and Summary In many Western families and among policy makers that seek to influence the behavior of parents in these families, the consistent finding that women invest more in the care of their children than men is a seemingly constant source of concern and consternation. The clarifying light of an evolutionary analysis places these concerns in perspective and allows us to more fully understand why these sex differences are found in every culture in which they have been studied and helps us to address the equally important question of why the differences are not larger (Geary, 2010). The latter is the real riddle, as men’s investment in their children is unusual among mammals and especially

Journal

Evolutionary PsychologySAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2010

References