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Book Review: Learning in Groups

Book Review: Learning in Groups Book Reviews 303 book it seems that ideologies are regarded as partially true perspectives and that a true theory consists in an aggregation or a synthesis of all perspectives (see, for example, the combining of intuitionist, empiricist and rationalist approaches in chapter two). The scope and level of this strategy need to be closely examined. It could be claimed that his own emphasis on human rights may covertly admit ideological elements (e.g. on the relationship of the individual to society). 5 Despite the social and cultural context discussed in chapter one, Vandenberg tends to regard educational issues and their resolution as occurring within an individual school, or even a class­ The direct task and responsibility of a teacher in room, as an isolated setting (see, e.g., pp.27 -30). a particular classroom may be clear enough, but it cannot be neatly detached from the influence of political, economic and other factors, or from the way the whole school is organized and the wider system of decision making in which it is placed. I shall offer only a few examples to illustrate what I take to be mistaken or confused claims. Whatever may be said of the arrogance and ignorance of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Education SAGE

Book Review: Learning in Groups

Australian Journal of Education , Volume 30 (3): 2 – Nov 1, 1986

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1986 Australian Council for Educational Research
ISSN
0004-9441
eISSN
2050-5884
DOI
10.1177/000494418603000309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 303 book it seems that ideologies are regarded as partially true perspectives and that a true theory consists in an aggregation or a synthesis of all perspectives (see, for example, the combining of intuitionist, empiricist and rationalist approaches in chapter two). The scope and level of this strategy need to be closely examined. It could be claimed that his own emphasis on human rights may covertly admit ideological elements (e.g. on the relationship of the individual to society). 5 Despite the social and cultural context discussed in chapter one, Vandenberg tends to regard educational issues and their resolution as occurring within an individual school, or even a class­ The direct task and responsibility of a teacher in room, as an isolated setting (see, e.g., pp.27 -30). a particular classroom may be clear enough, but it cannot be neatly detached from the influence of political, economic and other factors, or from the way the whole school is organized and the wider system of decision making in which it is placed. I shall offer only a few examples to illustrate what I take to be mistaken or confused claims. Whatever may be said of the arrogance and ignorance of

Journal

Australian Journal of EducationSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1986

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