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Book Review: Drama in English Teaching

Book Review: Drama in English Teaching Australian Journal of Education, Vol. 30, No.3, 1986, 300-308 Book Reviews Drama in English Teaching Tricia Evans Croom Helm, London, 1984. 186 pp., £14.95. As is implicit in the title of this volume, the author has a commitment to both drama and the teaching of English in the classroom. The book begins with a lament that the place of drama as a separate discipline in the curriculum has not improved significantly in the decade since the Bullock Committee reported that only 10 per cent of their representative sample of schools had distinct departments of drama. Evans believes that a current survey would reveal an erosion from the 1975 position because of financial constraints, insufficient numbers of specialist teachers of drama, and an expedient official beliefthat - since drama and English share a 'natural intimacy' - the interests of drama are best suited under the aegis of the English department. Evans does not support this view. She argues that not only is drama suffering from neglect in many schools but that, where it is taught, the teaching is either erratic or inadequate or both. This situation, she perceives, is not necessarily a function either of lack of interest or incompetence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Education SAGE

Book Review: Drama in English Teaching

Australian Journal of Education , Volume 30 (3): 2 – Nov 1, 1986

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1986 Australian Council for Educational Research
ISSN
0004-9441
eISSN
2050-5884
DOI
10.1177/000494418603000307
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Australian Journal of Education, Vol. 30, No.3, 1986, 300-308 Book Reviews Drama in English Teaching Tricia Evans Croom Helm, London, 1984. 186 pp., £14.95. As is implicit in the title of this volume, the author has a commitment to both drama and the teaching of English in the classroom. The book begins with a lament that the place of drama as a separate discipline in the curriculum has not improved significantly in the decade since the Bullock Committee reported that only 10 per cent of their representative sample of schools had distinct departments of drama. Evans believes that a current survey would reveal an erosion from the 1975 position because of financial constraints, insufficient numbers of specialist teachers of drama, and an expedient official beliefthat - since drama and English share a 'natural intimacy' - the interests of drama are best suited under the aegis of the English department. Evans does not support this view. She argues that not only is drama suffering from neglect in many schools but that, where it is taught, the teaching is either erratic or inadequate or both. This situation, she perceives, is not necessarily a function either of lack of interest or incompetence

Journal

Australian Journal of EducationSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1986

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