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Book Review: Deviance, Conformity and Control

Book Review: Deviance, Conformity and Control BOOK REVIEWS 93 He argues very cogently that the classical conception of human action, with its emphasis on freedom, rationalality and choice, has recently found favour with the rise of economic rationalism. As well as suiting monetarist economists it has also been very influential in criminology. The criminological version has similarly tended to be associated with political conservatism. This 'criminological version of monetarism' has focused on effective crime control, and assumes humans to be free, rational and capable of making independent choices. Hence it emphasises deterrence through punishment and can thus legitimately claim to be heir to the original modernist or classical position as laid down in the 18th century. Roshier describes how in the late 1960s and early 19708 these classical ideas were dealt with rather differently. Radical criminologists alongside other progressive academics, students and practitioners engaged in criminal justice practice at that time will remember the heady days of interactionism and societal reation theories. In this version, criminals and other members of deviant or marginal groups are portrayed as responding rationally to oppressive forces of social definition and reaction. The early radical criminology of this time saw itself as being free to be partisan, to fight back http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Book Review: Deviance, Conformity and Control

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
©The Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology and Authors, 1992
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/000486589302600112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS 93 He argues very cogently that the classical conception of human action, with its emphasis on freedom, rationalality and choice, has recently found favour with the rise of economic rationalism. As well as suiting monetarist economists it has also been very influential in criminology. The criminological version has similarly tended to be associated with political conservatism. This 'criminological version of monetarism' has focused on effective crime control, and assumes humans to be free, rational and capable of making independent choices. Hence it emphasises deterrence through punishment and can thus legitimately claim to be heir to the original modernist or classical position as laid down in the 18th century. Roshier describes how in the late 1960s and early 19708 these classical ideas were dealt with rather differently. Radical criminologists alongside other progressive academics, students and practitioners engaged in criminal justice practice at that time will remember the heady days of interactionism and societal reation theories. In this version, criminals and other members of deviant or marginal groups are portrayed as responding rationally to oppressive forces of social definition and reaction. The early radical criminology of this time saw itself as being free to be partisan, to fight back

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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