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Book Review: Cumulative Trauma Disorders in the Workplace: Costs, Prevention and Progress

Book Review: Cumulative Trauma Disorders in the Workplace: Costs, Prevention and Progress BOOK REVIEWS The articles cover a variety of related topics including compre­ The Biotechnology Cumulative Trauma hensive discussions of the physi­ Industry Disorders in the cal, chemical, biological, and by Alan M. Ducatman and Daniel cancer hazards encountered in Workplace: Costs, Liberman. the work environment. Other Prevention and Progress Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & topics include health (medical) BNA Special Report. Belfus, 1991. surveillance, radiation safety, Washington, DC: The Bureau of and facility design. National Affairs Inc., 1991. The Biotechnology Industry is a The text discusses worker health concerns associated with collection of articles which ad­ According to the Bureau of Labor dress worker health and safety biotechnology and includes hy­ Statistics, Cumulative Trauma issues in a relatively new and persensitivity reactions related Disorders (CTD) accounted for growing industry which prom­ to workplace exposures. The 52% of all occupational illness ises to revolutionize health care, components of a health (medical) cases in 1989, making CTDs the pharmacology, agriculture, and surveillance program are briefly leading cause of occupational ill­ chemical production. Contribut­ discussed. The need to increase ness in the United States. This ing authors are primarily physi­ the scientific knowledge base report published in 1991 pre­ cians but also include an indus­ concerning worker exposure and sents research and case studies trial hygienist, .a chemist, a consequent effects on worker exploring the problem. biologist, and safety profession­ health is identified as a priority. An overview asks the question the health The articles which deal with als. One member of "Is there a huge epidemic out safety and the work environ­ and safety team conspicuously there?" and then presents data ment review the basic compo­ missing from the list of contrib­ that begin to answer the ques­ nents of an effective safety pro­ uting authors, as well as the text tion. The case studies are based gram, including risk assess­ in general, is the occupational on the specific industrial settings ment, worker education, and health nurse. This is especially which supply a small piece of the distressing, as it is intuitively engineering controls. The safety puzzle. Although the book does issues typify those commonly obvious that nursing will play an not completely solve the problem, found in chemical and biological important role in providing it does show hope for eliminating health care services to this laboratory environments. CTDs from certain industries, This text may be of some use to worker population. using ergonomics. Occupational the occupational health nurse To acquaint the reader who is health nurses can obtain many who is considering practice in the unfamiliar with biotechnology, ideas on prevention from the biotechnology industry, despite the text appropriately begins book. the fact that occupational health with an overview which de­ This small book packed with nursing is not specifically ad­ scribes the products, advances, information should fit neatly in and directions of the microbiol­ dressed. The book contains useful the occupational health library. information pertaining to occupa­ ogy industry. The remaining ar­ Susan C. Jorgensen, RN tional health and safety which ticles follow in no particular logi­ Mason, Ohio cal sequence. For example, may assist in identifying and de­ articles which address the differ­ veloping the role of occupational health nurses in the delivery of ent types of hazards found in the health and safety services in the biotechnology industry are scat­ biotechnology industry. tered throughout the text. Michael E. Jarrett, MPH, RN Montgomery, AL AAOHNJOURNAL http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

Book Review: Cumulative Trauma Disorders in the Workplace: Costs, Prevention and Progress

AAOHN Journal , Volume 40 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1992

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1992 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999204000615
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS The articles cover a variety of related topics including compre­ The Biotechnology Cumulative Trauma hensive discussions of the physi­ Industry Disorders in the cal, chemical, biological, and by Alan M. Ducatman and Daniel cancer hazards encountered in Workplace: Costs, Liberman. the work environment. Other Prevention and Progress Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & topics include health (medical) BNA Special Report. Belfus, 1991. surveillance, radiation safety, Washington, DC: The Bureau of and facility design. National Affairs Inc., 1991. The Biotechnology Industry is a The text discusses worker health concerns associated with collection of articles which ad­ According to the Bureau of Labor dress worker health and safety biotechnology and includes hy­ Statistics, Cumulative Trauma issues in a relatively new and persensitivity reactions related Disorders (CTD) accounted for growing industry which prom­ to workplace exposures. The 52% of all occupational illness ises to revolutionize health care, components of a health (medical) cases in 1989, making CTDs the pharmacology, agriculture, and surveillance program are briefly leading cause of occupational ill­ chemical production. Contribut­ discussed. The need to increase ness in the United States. This ing authors are primarily physi­ the scientific knowledge base report published in 1991 pre­ cians but also include an indus­ concerning worker exposure and sents research and case studies trial hygienist, .a chemist, a consequent effects on worker exploring the problem. biologist, and safety profession­ health is identified as a priority. An overview asks the question the health The articles which deal with als. One member of "Is there a huge epidemic out safety and the work environ­ and safety team conspicuously there?" and then presents data ment review the basic compo­ missing from the list of contrib­ that begin to answer the ques­ nents of an effective safety pro­ uting authors, as well as the text tion. The case studies are based gram, including risk assess­ in general, is the occupational on the specific industrial settings ment, worker education, and health nurse. This is especially which supply a small piece of the distressing, as it is intuitively engineering controls. The safety puzzle. Although the book does issues typify those commonly obvious that nursing will play an not completely solve the problem, found in chemical and biological important role in providing it does show hope for eliminating health care services to this laboratory environments. CTDs from certain industries, This text may be of some use to worker population. using ergonomics. Occupational the occupational health nurse To acquaint the reader who is health nurses can obtain many who is considering practice in the unfamiliar with biotechnology, ideas on prevention from the biotechnology industry, despite the text appropriately begins book. the fact that occupational health with an overview which de­ This small book packed with nursing is not specifically ad­ scribes the products, advances, information should fit neatly in and directions of the microbiol­ dressed. The book contains useful the occupational health library. information pertaining to occupa­ ogy industry. The remaining ar­ Susan C. Jorgensen, RN tional health and safety which ticles follow in no particular logi­ Mason, Ohio cal sequence. For example, may assist in identifying and de­ articles which address the differ­ veloping the role of occupational health nurses in the delivery of ent types of hazards found in the health and safety services in the biotechnology industry are scat­ biotechnology industry. tered throughout the text. Michael E. Jarrett, MPH, RN Montgomery, AL AAOHNJOURNAL

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 1992

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