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Book Review: Back to School: The Way Forward

Book Review: Back to School: The Way Forward Book Reviews 307 Lifelong learning and Higher Education Christopher K. Knapper and Arthur J. Cropley Croom Helm, London, 1985. 201 pp. £15.95 As the authors point out, the notion of lifelong learning is very fuzzy with a number of over­ lapping meanings. The first three chapters of the book are concerned with theoretical and conceptual considerations but I experienced great difficulty in forming a clear idea of what it was the authors were talking about. I finally decided that they took lifelong education to be concerned with promoting a set of skills and attitudes which would encourage and support learning throughout adult life. The book is thus intended to offer 'guidelines for educational practice aimed at fostering learning throughout life' (p. 20). The remaining chapters discuss some of the changes required if higher education institutions are to make this one of their major goals. These include modifications to teaching and assessment methods, adjustments in staff attitudes, and the loosening of institutional constraints which inhibit change. Suggested ways of bringing about change include staff development programs, study skill assistance for students, and a more vigorous deployment of instructional tech­ nology. Chapter S draws attention to a number of approaches to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Education SAGE

Book Review: Back to School: The Way Forward

Australian Journal of Education , Volume 30 (3): 2 – Nov 1, 1986

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1986 Australian Council for Educational Research
ISSN
0004-9441
eISSN
2050-5884
DOI
10.1177/000494418603000313
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 307 Lifelong learning and Higher Education Christopher K. Knapper and Arthur J. Cropley Croom Helm, London, 1985. 201 pp. £15.95 As the authors point out, the notion of lifelong learning is very fuzzy with a number of over­ lapping meanings. The first three chapters of the book are concerned with theoretical and conceptual considerations but I experienced great difficulty in forming a clear idea of what it was the authors were talking about. I finally decided that they took lifelong education to be concerned with promoting a set of skills and attitudes which would encourage and support learning throughout adult life. The book is thus intended to offer 'guidelines for educational practice aimed at fostering learning throughout life' (p. 20). The remaining chapters discuss some of the changes required if higher education institutions are to make this one of their major goals. These include modifications to teaching and assessment methods, adjustments in staff attitudes, and the loosening of institutional constraints which inhibit change. Suggested ways of bringing about change include staff development programs, study skill assistance for students, and a more vigorous deployment of instructional tech­ nology. Chapter S draws attention to a number of approaches to

Journal

Australian Journal of EducationSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 1986

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