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Book Review

Book Review CURTIS E. TATE, JR., LEON C. MEGGINSON, CHARLES R. SCOTT, JR. AND LYLE R. TRUEBLOOD. Successful Small Business Management Business Publica­ tions, Inc., Revised Edition, 1978. This text in small business management is organized into the following seven major parts: Part I, characteristics of small business and their owner-managers; Part II, planning and organizing a new business; Part III, staffing your business; Part IV, producing your product or service; Part V, marketing your product or service; Part VI, profit planning and control; Part VII, some special considerations in managing an independent business. Generally, the book is logically organized, easily comprehended and for the most part, comprehensive. The cases included at the end of each part are short but require in depth knowledge of the material to which they are related. The questions at the end of each case are extensive which serve to focus attention on important issues. Included is a glossary of the most frequently used business terms which is of extreme value to students and non-students alike who have not been grounded in a common body of knowledge generally taught in Schools of Business. Of particular value and interest is an in depth discussion of the introspective personal analysis that each person should make prior to the decision to start a small business. Lacking in the material presented are discussions of social responsibil­ ity of the small businessman and the ever increasing international activities and opportunities of small business. These deficiencies are not glaring and can be overcome through supplemental readings. The book is written on a level that is interesting and challenging to undergraduate students and practitioners. Although business students would find it lacking in depth in some areas, the text remains a valuable addition to their libraries. Alfred Falthzik, University of Baltimore http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

Book Review

American Journal of Small Business , Volume 5 (3): 1 – Jan 1, 1981

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1981 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225878100500309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CURTIS E. TATE, JR., LEON C. MEGGINSON, CHARLES R. SCOTT, JR. AND LYLE R. TRUEBLOOD. Successful Small Business Management Business Publica­ tions, Inc., Revised Edition, 1978. This text in small business management is organized into the following seven major parts: Part I, characteristics of small business and their owner-managers; Part II, planning and organizing a new business; Part III, staffing your business; Part IV, producing your product or service; Part V, marketing your product or service; Part VI, profit planning and control; Part VII, some special considerations in managing an independent business. Generally, the book is logically organized, easily comprehended and for the most part, comprehensive. The cases included at the end of each part are short but require in depth knowledge of the material to which they are related. The questions at the end of each case are extensive which serve to focus attention on important issues. Included is a glossary of the most frequently used business terms which is of extreme value to students and non-students alike who have not been grounded in a common body of knowledge generally taught in Schools of Business. Of particular value and interest is an in depth discussion of the introspective personal analysis that each person should make prior to the decision to start a small business. Lacking in the material presented are discussions of social responsibil­ ity of the small businessman and the ever increasing international activities and opportunities of small business. These deficiencies are not glaring and can be overcome through supplemental readings. The book is written on a level that is interesting and challenging to undergraduate students and practitioners. Although business students would find it lacking in depth in some areas, the text remains a valuable addition to their libraries. Alfred Falthzik, University of Baltimore

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1981

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