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AIDS Education Strategies

AIDS Education Strategies AIDS Education Strategies EVALUATING THE FEAR RESPONSE by Christine Sheehy, OPA, RN, and Virginia Trudeau, MSN, RN m ong Americans, the first level of inter­ Windgassen, 1987). The syndrome has variously vention (i.e., dissemination of informa­ been described as "AIDS panic," "pseudo-AIDS," A tion) in managing the AIDS imperative and "AIDS phobia" (Jacob, 1987; Riccio, 1987; has largely been accomplished. The next educa­ Windgassen, 1987). tional concern is behavior and attitude modifica­ The phenomenon is characterized by a promi­ tion (Office of Technology Assessment, 1988; So­ nent fear of having contracted AIDS, despite rian, 1988). Positive and appropriate behavioral negative laboratory findings (Riccio, 1988; practices are the desired outcome of the educa­ Windgassen, 1987). The term "worried well" is tional process. However, evidence suggests that used to characterize persons at high risk (e.g., negative attitudes and behaviors persist (Bond, homosexual men) whose lives are profoundly af­ 1990; Damrosch, 1990; Kelly, 1988; Rubinow, fected by AIDS, and who fear past or future 1984; Simmons-Alling, 1984; Viele, 1984). infection with the disease. The public at large has This article describes a pilot study to explore responded with classic plague behavior of isola­ whether fearful attitudes of clinicians contribute tion and dread http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AAOHN Journal SAGE

AIDS Education Strategies

AAOHN Journal , Volume 40 (6): 8 – Jun 1, 1992

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1992 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
ISSN
0891-0162
DOI
10.1177/216507999204000602
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AIDS Education Strategies EVALUATING THE FEAR RESPONSE by Christine Sheehy, OPA, RN, and Virginia Trudeau, MSN, RN m ong Americans, the first level of inter­ Windgassen, 1987). The syndrome has variously vention (i.e., dissemination of informa­ been described as "AIDS panic," "pseudo-AIDS," A tion) in managing the AIDS imperative and "AIDS phobia" (Jacob, 1987; Riccio, 1987; has largely been accomplished. The next educa­ Windgassen, 1987). tional concern is behavior and attitude modifica­ The phenomenon is characterized by a promi­ tion (Office of Technology Assessment, 1988; So­ nent fear of having contracted AIDS, despite rian, 1988). Positive and appropriate behavioral negative laboratory findings (Riccio, 1988; practices are the desired outcome of the educa­ Windgassen, 1987). The term "worried well" is tional process. However, evidence suggests that used to characterize persons at high risk (e.g., negative attitudes and behaviors persist (Bond, homosexual men) whose lives are profoundly af­ 1990; Damrosch, 1990; Kelly, 1988; Rubinow, fected by AIDS, and who fear past or future 1984; Simmons-Alling, 1984; Viele, 1984). infection with the disease. The public at large has This article describes a pilot study to explore responded with classic plague behavior of isola­ whether fearful attitudes of clinicians contribute tion and dread

Journal

AAOHN JournalSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 1992

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