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Accept Journalistic Work as ‘Output’ to Keep the Professional ‘Street Cred’ in Teaching Journalism

Accept Journalistic Work as ‘Output’ to Keep the Professional ‘Street Cred’ in Teaching Journalism The process for producing high quality journalism mimics every component necessary to scholarly research—data gathering, theory testing, reviewing previous literature, writing formulas, jurying by colleagues. The very best in journalism most certainly builds knowledge. The intellectual and physical effort to produce substantial journalism varies little from that necessary for scholarly output. This commentary explains why accepting journalistic work as ‘output’ is vital to keeping a faculty with the professional ‘street cred’ for today’s journalism students. Failing to do so is a disservice to our students and it risks producing students without practiced, professional skills. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia Pacific Media Educator SAGE

Accept Journalistic Work as ‘Output’ to Keep the Professional ‘Street Cred’ in Teaching Journalism

Asia Pacific Media Educator , Volume 25 (1): 7 – Jun 1, 2015

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2015 University of Wollongong, Australia
ISSN
1326-365X
eISSN
2321-5410
DOI
10.1177/1326365X15575566
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The process for producing high quality journalism mimics every component necessary to scholarly research—data gathering, theory testing, reviewing previous literature, writing formulas, jurying by colleagues. The very best in journalism most certainly builds knowledge. The intellectual and physical effort to produce substantial journalism varies little from that necessary for scholarly output. This commentary explains why accepting journalistic work as ‘output’ is vital to keeping a faculty with the professional ‘street cred’ for today’s journalism students. Failing to do so is a disservice to our students and it risks producing students without practiced, professional skills.

Journal

Asia Pacific Media EducatorSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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