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Aborigines and Prisons: a South Australian Study

Aborigines and Prisons: a South Australian Study :l46 AUST. & N.Z. JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (December, 1973): 6. 4 Aborigines and Prisons: a South AustraLian Study DAVID· BILES* ABORIGINAL people in South Australia, and in all other mainland States, are typically socially under-privileged and economically deprived. The reasons for this lie deep in Australia's history and their general conditions have not been significantly improved by measures taken in recent years by State and Federal governments and numerous private organisations. Notwithstanding the neglect, ill-treatment and discrimination against Aborigines in the past, the current law in South Australia contains no biases which are based on racial factors. The agents of the law (police, courts, and corrections) also may not today lawfully discriminate against Aborigines or any other racial minority. To the extent that this is true, the general plight of Aborigines, and the particular involvement of Aborigines with the law and its agents, are matters which lie beyond the scope of this article. However, it is impossible to ignore the fact that disproportionately large numbers of Aborigines are sentenced to periods of imprisonment and that their presence in prisons constitutes a special problem for correctional authorities. A perspective on the size of the problem of Aboriginal imprisonment may be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology SAGE

Aborigines and Prisons: a South Australian Study

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0004-8658
eISSN
1837-9273
DOI
10.1177/000486587300600406
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

:l46 AUST. & N.Z. JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY (December, 1973): 6. 4 Aborigines and Prisons: a South AustraLian Study DAVID· BILES* ABORIGINAL people in South Australia, and in all other mainland States, are typically socially under-privileged and economically deprived. The reasons for this lie deep in Australia's history and their general conditions have not been significantly improved by measures taken in recent years by State and Federal governments and numerous private organisations. Notwithstanding the neglect, ill-treatment and discrimination against Aborigines in the past, the current law in South Australia contains no biases which are based on racial factors. The agents of the law (police, courts, and corrections) also may not today lawfully discriminate against Aborigines or any other racial minority. To the extent that this is true, the general plight of Aborigines, and the particular involvement of Aborigines with the law and its agents, are matters which lie beyond the scope of this article. However, it is impossible to ignore the fact that disproportionately large numbers of Aborigines are sentenced to periods of imprisonment and that their presence in prisons constitutes a special problem for correctional authorities. A perspective on the size of the problem of Aboriginal imprisonment may be

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of CriminologySAGE

Published: Dec 1, 1973

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