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A Look at the Female Entrepreneur

A Look at the Female Entrepreneur Distinguished Guest Editorial PAT L. BURR, AHistant Administrator for Management AHistance U. S. Small Business Administration In measuring the health of our national economy, we are disposed to review periodical statistics on the gross national product, balance of payments, capital investments, and unemployment rates. However, our business system must be viewed as more than a mere balance sheet of national productivity. It is also the method whereby people provide for their families, accumulate wealth, and achieve the incomparable benefits of self-esteem that can be derived from personal participation in a business enterprise. We have a national commitment in law and heritage, to personal equality. Yet, unless this equality finds expression in the business world we cannot rightly conclude that we have realized our national commitment nor that our economy is truly healthy. Economic activity of women is seldom expressed in terms of entrepreneurship. Until recently, economic gains for women have been seen in terms of job equality, promotional opportunity, and entry into formerly segregated job classifications. According to the C~nsus Bureau of the Department of Commerce in 1972 only 4.6 percent of all American businesses - approximately 400,000 - were owned by women. Furthermore, these businesses generated less than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Small Business SAGE

A Look at the Female Entrepreneur

American Journal of Small Business , Volume 2 (3): 4 – Jan 1, 1978

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1978 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0363-9428
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1177/104225877800200301
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Distinguished Guest Editorial PAT L. BURR, AHistant Administrator for Management AHistance U. S. Small Business Administration In measuring the health of our national economy, we are disposed to review periodical statistics on the gross national product, balance of payments, capital investments, and unemployment rates. However, our business system must be viewed as more than a mere balance sheet of national productivity. It is also the method whereby people provide for their families, accumulate wealth, and achieve the incomparable benefits of self-esteem that can be derived from personal participation in a business enterprise. We have a national commitment in law and heritage, to personal equality. Yet, unless this equality finds expression in the business world we cannot rightly conclude that we have realized our national commitment nor that our economy is truly healthy. Economic activity of women is seldom expressed in terms of entrepreneurship. Until recently, economic gains for women have been seen in terms of job equality, promotional opportunity, and entry into formerly segregated job classifications. According to the C~nsus Bureau of the Department of Commerce in 1972 only 4.6 percent of all American businesses - approximately 400,000 - were owned by women. Furthermore, these businesses generated less than

Journal

American Journal of Small BusinessSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1978

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