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A Challenge for Higher Education

A Challenge for Higher Education EDUCATIWG THE WORK FORCE AChallenge for Higher Education Edwln L. Slmpm hroughout history American and thus loss of productivity-a major yardstick industry and higher education of corporate achievement. Because management traditionally have been at odds. may see worker participation in additional train- Although it seems reasonable that ing as a threat to reaching production quotas, they could benefit from cooperative alliances, they may not enthusiastically support it. unclear expectations, educational elitism, and lack Colleges and universities that are unable to of information about what is “practical” and package programs in flexible formats, both day cost-effective have stood in the way. With and night, at the worksite, with the worker’s industry encountering a challenging new age of level of consumption and lifestyle taken into rapid technological advancement and with univer- consideration, have trouble convincing industry sities and colleges seeking to catch up with rele- of the efficacy of joint agreements. Likewise, vant responses to societal demands, isn’t it time corporations that seem to have time only for to try anew? We pondered this question as “quick and slick” training that can show imme- Northern Illinois University developed a proposal date corporate pay-offs, do not usually impress for UAW-Chrysler training personnel http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Adult Learning SAGE

A Challenge for Higher Education

Adult Learning , Volume 1 (1): 9 – Sep 1, 1989

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1989 American Association for Adult and Continuing Education
ISSN
1045-1595
eISSN
2162-4070
DOI
10.1177/104515958900100107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDUCATIWG THE WORK FORCE AChallenge for Higher Education Edwln L. Slmpm hroughout history American and thus loss of productivity-a major yardstick industry and higher education of corporate achievement. Because management traditionally have been at odds. may see worker participation in additional train- Although it seems reasonable that ing as a threat to reaching production quotas, they could benefit from cooperative alliances, they may not enthusiastically support it. unclear expectations, educational elitism, and lack Colleges and universities that are unable to of information about what is “practical” and package programs in flexible formats, both day cost-effective have stood in the way. With and night, at the worksite, with the worker’s industry encountering a challenging new age of level of consumption and lifestyle taken into rapid technological advancement and with univer- consideration, have trouble convincing industry sities and colleges seeking to catch up with rele- of the efficacy of joint agreements. Likewise, vant responses to societal demands, isn’t it time corporations that seem to have time only for to try anew? We pondered this question as “quick and slick” training that can show imme- Northern Illinois University developed a proposal date corporate pay-offs, do not usually impress for UAW-Chrysler training personnel

Journal

Adult LearningSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1989

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