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Monitoring Seed Viability of Fifteen Species After Storage in the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank

Monitoring Seed Viability of Fifteen Species After Storage in the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank Germination trials of fifteen rare and endangered Irish plant species, representing twenty-two accessions, were conducted after up to seven years storage in the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank. Seeds had been stored at low moisture content (approximately 5 per cent) and at low temperature (–18°C). A variety of results was obtained, with some species showing a significant increase in percentage germination, some showing a significant decrease in percentage germination and others showing no significant change. Within a species, consistent results were not always obtained, with individual accessions sometimes showing varied germination results. Consistent monitoring of seed storage conditions along with regular viability checks is recommended in order to improve the management of the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank. Based on the results presented here, the extrapolation of results from one accession of a species to include all other accessions of the species is not recommended. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy Royal Irish Academy

Monitoring Seed Viability of Fifteen Species After Storage in the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank

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Publisher
Royal Irish Academy
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 RIA
ISSN
0791-7945
eISSN
2009-003X
DOI
10.3318/BIOE.2003.103.2.59
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Germination trials of fifteen rare and endangered Irish plant species, representing twenty-two accessions, were conducted after up to seven years storage in the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank. Seeds had been stored at low moisture content (approximately 5 per cent) and at low temperature (–18°C). A variety of results was obtained, with some species showing a significant increase in percentage germination, some showing a significant decrease in percentage germination and others showing no significant change. Within a species, consistent results were not always obtained, with individual accessions sometimes showing varied germination results. Consistent monitoring of seed storage conditions along with regular viability checks is recommended in order to improve the management of the Irish Threatened Plant Genebank. Based on the results presented here, the extrapolation of results from one accession of a species to include all other accessions of the species is not recommended.

Journal

Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish AcademyRoyal Irish Academy

Published: May 1, 2003

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