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Physiologic and pathologic tremors. Diagnosis, mechanism, and management.

Physiologic and pathologic tremors. Diagnosis, mechanism, and management. Tremor, the commonest of the involuntary movement disorders, is characterized by rhythmical oscillatory movement that occurs at rest or during activity; all tremors cease during sleep. Physiologic tremor is present in normal persons and is asymptomatic. Tremor is considered pathologic when it impairs a patient's function. Clinically, the pathologic tremors may be classified as accentuated physiologic, parkinsonian, essential, and cerebellar. We review here the basic mechanisms and clinical features of various tremors and emphasize recent advances in pathophysiology and management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of internal medicine Pubmed

Physiologic and pathologic tremors. Diagnosis, mechanism, and management.

Annals of internal medicine , Volume 93 (3): -454 – Jan 26, 1981

Physiologic and pathologic tremors. Diagnosis, mechanism, and management.


Abstract

Tremor, the commonest of the involuntary movement disorders, is characterized by rhythmical oscillatory movement that occurs at rest or during activity; all tremors cease during sleep. Physiologic tremor is present in normal persons and is asymptomatic. Tremor is considered pathologic when it impairs a patient's function. Clinically, the pathologic tremors may be classified as accentuated physiologic, parkinsonian, essential, and cerebellar. We review here the basic mechanisms and clinical features of various tremors and emphasize recent advances in pathophysiology and management.

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ISSN
0003-4819
DOI
10.7326/0003-4819-93-3-460
pmid
7001967

Abstract

Tremor, the commonest of the involuntary movement disorders, is characterized by rhythmical oscillatory movement that occurs at rest or during activity; all tremors cease during sleep. Physiologic tremor is present in normal persons and is asymptomatic. Tremor is considered pathologic when it impairs a patient's function. Clinically, the pathologic tremors may be classified as accentuated physiologic, parkinsonian, essential, and cerebellar. We review here the basic mechanisms and clinical features of various tremors and emphasize recent advances in pathophysiology and management.

Journal

Annals of internal medicinePubmed

Published: Jan 26, 1981

There are no references for this article.