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Multilayer membranes via layer-by-layer deposition of organic polymer protected Prussian blue nanoparticles and glucose oxidase for glucose biosensing.

Multilayer membranes via layer-by-layer deposition of organic polymer protected Prussian blue... Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) are now widely used for bioanalytical applications. In this work, a bilayer of poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) is consecutively adsorbed on 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid modified Au electrode surfaces, forming stable, ultrathin multilayer films. Subsequently, Prussian blue nanoparticles protected by PDDA (denoted as P-PB) and negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOx) are consecutively adsorbed onto the PSS-terminated bilayer. The growth of each of the P-PB/GOx bilayers is followed quantitatively using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and the electrochemical method. The P-PB nanoparticles can catalyze the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide formed from enzymatic reaction at lower potential and inhibit the responses of interferents, such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Performance of the multilayer films can be tailored by controlling the number of bilayers. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.10 to 11.0 mM and a detection limit of 10 microM were achieved. The glucose biosensor has good stability and reproducibility. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Langmuir Pubmed

Multilayer membranes via layer-by-layer deposition of organic polymer protected Prussian blue nanoparticles and glucose oxidase for glucose biosensing.

Langmuir , Volume 21 (21): -9625 – Apr 10, 2007

Multilayer membranes via layer-by-layer deposition of organic polymer protected Prussian blue nanoparticles and glucose oxidase for glucose biosensing.


Abstract

Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) are now widely used for bioanalytical applications. In this work, a bilayer of poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) is consecutively adsorbed on 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid modified Au electrode surfaces, forming stable, ultrathin multilayer films. Subsequently, Prussian blue nanoparticles protected by PDDA (denoted as P-PB) and negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOx) are consecutively adsorbed onto the PSS-terminated bilayer. The growth of each of the P-PB/GOx bilayers is followed quantitatively using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and the electrochemical method. The P-PB nanoparticles can catalyze the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide formed from enzymatic reaction at lower potential and inhibit the responses of interferents, such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Performance of the multilayer films can be tailored by controlling the number of bilayers. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.10 to 11.0 mM and a detection limit of 10 microM were achieved. The glucose biosensor has good stability and reproducibility.

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ISSN
0743-7463
DOI
10.1021/la051370+
pmid
16207046

Abstract

Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) are now widely used for bioanalytical applications. In this work, a bilayer of poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) is consecutively adsorbed on 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid modified Au electrode surfaces, forming stable, ultrathin multilayer films. Subsequently, Prussian blue nanoparticles protected by PDDA (denoted as P-PB) and negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOx) are consecutively adsorbed onto the PSS-terminated bilayer. The growth of each of the P-PB/GOx bilayers is followed quantitatively using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and the electrochemical method. The P-PB nanoparticles can catalyze the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide formed from enzymatic reaction at lower potential and inhibit the responses of interferents, such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Performance of the multilayer films can be tailored by controlling the number of bilayers. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.10 to 11.0 mM and a detection limit of 10 microM were achieved. The glucose biosensor has good stability and reproducibility.

Journal

LangmuirPubmed

Published: Apr 10, 2007

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